TZOO-2012.12.31-10K

UNITED STATES
SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
Washington, D.C. 20549
______________________________________________________________________________
Form 10-K
______________________________________________________________________________ 
(Mark One)
x
ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
For the fiscal year ended December 31, 2012
or 
¨
TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
For the transition period from              to             .
Commission File No.: 000-50171
_______________________________________________________________________________ 
TRAVELZOO INC.
(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)
 ________________________________________________________________________________
DELAWARE
36-4415727
(State or other jurisdiction of
incorporation or organization)
(I.R.S. employer
identification no.)
 
 
590 Madison Avenue, 37th Floor
New York, New York
10022
(Address of principal executive offices)
(Zip code)
Registrant’s telephone number, including area code: (212) 484-4900

SECURITIES REGISTERED PURSUANT TO SECTION 12(b) OF THE ACT:
NONE
SECURITIES REGISTERED PURSUANT TO SECTION 12(g) OF THE ACT:
Common Stock, $0.01 Par Value
(Title of Class)
_________________________________________________________________________________ 
indicate by check mark if the Registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act.    Yes  ¨    No  x
Indicate by check mark if the Registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Act.    Yes  ¨    No  x
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.    Yes  x    No  ¨
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate website, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files).    Yes  x    No  ¨
    
Indicate by check mark if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S-K is not contained herein, and will not be contained, to the best of Registrant’s knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K or any amendment to this Form 10-K. x

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, or a smaller reporting company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act. (Check one): 
Large accelerated filer
¨
Accelerated filer
x
 
 
 
 
Non-accelerated filer
¨  (Do not check if a smaller reporting company)
Smaller reporting company
¨
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act).    Yes  ¨    No  x
As of June 29, 2012, the aggregate market value of voting stock held by non-affiliates of the Registrant, based upon the closing sales price for the Registrant's Common Stock, as reported on the NASDAQ Global Select Market, was $169,514,556.
The number of shares of Travelzoo common stock outstanding as of February 8, 2013 was 15,361,873 shares.
 
DOCUMENTS INCORPORATED BY REFERENCE
Portions of the Registrant's Proxy Statement for its 2013 Annual Meeting of Stockholders are incorporated by reference in this Form 10-K in response to Part III, Items 10, 11, 12, 13, and 14.



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Table of Contents

TRAVELZOO INC.
Table of Contents
 
PART I
Page
PART II
 
PART III
 
PART IV
 
 

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PART I
Forward-Looking Statements
The information in this Report contains forward-looking statements within the meaning of Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, and Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended. Such statements are based upon current expectations, assumptions, estimates and projections about Travelzoo Inc. and our industry. These forward-looking statements are subject to the many risks and uncertainties that exist in our operations and business environment that may cause actual results, performance or achievements of Travelzoo to be different from those expected or anticipated in the forward-looking statements. Any statements contained herein that are not statements of historical fact may be deemed to be forward-looking statements. For example, words such as “may”, “will”, “should”, “estimates”, “predicts”, “potential”, “continue”, “strategy”, “believes”, “anticipates”, “plans”, “expects”, “intends”, and similar expressions are intended to identify forward-looking statements. Travelzoo's actual results and the timing of certain events could differ significantly from those anticipated in such forward-looking statements. Factors that might cause or contribute to such a discrepancy include, but are not limited to, those discussed in this Report in Part I Item 1A and the risks discussed in our other Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”) filings. The forward-looking statements included in this Report reflect the beliefs of our management on the date of this Report. We undertake no obligation to update publicly any forward-looking statements for any reason, even if new information becomes available or other events or circumstances occur in the future.
Item 1. Business
Overview
Travelzoo Inc. (the “Company” or “Travelzoo”) is a global Internet media company. We inform over 26 million subscribers in North America, Europe and Asia Pacific, as well as millions of website users, about the best travel, entertainment and local deals available from thousands of companies. Our deal experts source, research and test-book offers, recommending only those that meet Travelzoo's rigorous quality standards. We provide travel, entertainment, and local businesses with a fast, flexible, and cost effective way to reach millions of consumers. Our revenues are generated primarily from advertising fees. In Asia Pacific, the Travelzoo business is operated by Travelzoo (Asia) Limited and Travelzoo Japan K.K. under a license agreement with Travelzoo Inc. and is not owned by the Company.
Our publications and products include the Travelzoo websites (www.travelzoo.com, www.travelzoo.ca, www.travelzoo.co.uk, www.travelzoo.de, www.travelzoo.es, www.travelzoo.fr, among others), the Travelzoo iPhone and Android applications, the Travelzoo Top 20 e-mail newsletter, and the Newsflash e-mail alert service. We operate SuperSearch, a pay-per-click travel search tool, and the Travelzoo Network, a network of third-party websites that list deals published by Travelzoo. We also operate Fly.com, a travel search engine that allows users to quickly and easily find the best prices on flights from hundreds of airlines and online travel agencies. In addition, we operate Local Deals and Getaway services, which allow our subscribers to purchase vouchers for deals from local businesses such as spas, hotels and restaurants through the Travelzoo website and mobile applications. Voucher promotional offers are redeemable at the local businesses during the promotional period. We receive a percentage of the face value of the voucher from the local businesses.
In 2009, we sold our Asia Pacific operating segment to Azzurro Capital Inc. and its wholly-owned subsidiaries, Travelzoo (Asia) Limited and Travelzoo Japan K.K. The results of operations of the Asia Pacific operating segment have been classified as discontinued operations for all periods presented. We have not had significant ongoing involvement with the operations of the Asia Pacific operating segment and have not had material economic interests in the Asia Pacific operating segment since the completion of the sale. Starting November 1, 2009, the Travelzoo websites in Asia Pacific (cn.travelzoo.com, www.travelzoo.co.jp, www.travelzoo.com.au, www.travelzoo.com.hk, www.travelzoo.com.tw, among others), the Travelzoo iPhone and Android applications in Asia Pacific, the Travelzoo Top 20 e-mail newsletters in Asia Pacific and the Newsflash e-mail alert service in Asia Pacific have been published by Travelzoo (Asia) Limited and Travelzoo Japan K.K., under a license agreement with the Company. There is a reciprocal revenue-sharing agreement among the entities operating the Travelzoo business in Asia Pacific and the Company related to cross-selling audiences, channels and offers.
More than 2,000 companies use our services, including Air New Zealand, Apple Vacations, British Airways, Harrah's Entertainment, Expedia, Fairmont Hotels and Resorts, Hilton Hotels, Interstate Hotels & Resorts, Key Tours International, Liberty Travel, Marriott Hotels, Royal Caribbean, Spirit Airlines, Starwood Hotels & Resorts Worldwide, Travelocity, United Airlines, and Virgin Atlantic.

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Our revenues are advertising revenues, consisting primarily of listing fees paid by travel, entertainment and local businesses to advertise their offers on Travelzoo's media properties. Listing fees are based on audience reach, placement, number of listings, number of impressions, number of click-throughs, number of referrals, or percentage of the face value of vouchers sold. Insertion orders are typically for periods between one month and twelve months and are not automatically renewed. Merchant agreements for Local Deals and Getaway advertisers are typically for twelve months and are not automatically renewed. Our revenues have grown on an annual basis since we began operations in 1998. Our revenues increased from approximately $84,000 for the period from May 21, 1998 (inception) to December 31, 1998, to approximately $151 million for the year ended December 31, 2012.
We have two operating segments based on geographic regions: North America and Europe. North America consists of our operations in Canada and the U.S. Europe consists of our operations in France, Germany, Spain, and the U.K. For the year ended December 31, 2012, European operations were 28% of revenues. Financial information with respect to our business segments and certain financial information about geographic areas appears in Note 8 to the accompanying consolidated financial statements.
Our principal business office is located at 590 Madison Avenue, 37th Floor, New York, New York 10022.
Travelzoo is controlled by Ralph Bartel, who held beneficially approximately 50.5% of the outstanding shares as of December 31, 2012.
The Company was formed as a result of a combination and merger of entities founded by the Company's majority stockholder, Ralph Bartel. In 1998, Mr. Bartel founded Travelzoo.com Corporation, a Bahamas corporation, which issued 5,155,874 shares via the Internet to approximately 700,000 “Netsurfer stockholders” for no cash consideration, but subject to certain conditions as referred to below. In 1998, Mr. Bartel also founded Silicon Channels Corporation, a California corporation, to operate the Travelzoo website. During 2001, Travelzoo Inc. was formed as a subsidiary of Travelzoo.com Corporation, and Mr. Bartel contributed all of the outstanding shares of Silicon Channels Corporation to Travelzoo Inc. in exchange for 8,129,273 shares of Travelzoo Inc. and options to acquire an additional 2,158,349 shares at $1.00. Mr. Bartel exercised these options in January 2009.
In April 2002, Travelzoo.com Corporation was merged into Travelzoo Inc. Under and subject to the terms of the merger agreement, stockholders were allowed a period of two years following the effective date of the merger to receive one share of Travelzoo Inc. in exchange for each outstanding share of common stock of Travelzoo.com Corporation. The records of Travelzoo.com Corporation showed that, assuming all of the shares applied for by the Netsurfer stockholders were validly issued, there were 11,295,874 shares of Travelzoo.com Corporation outstanding. As of April 25, 2004, two years following the effective date of the merger, 7,180,342 shares of Travelzoo.com Corporation had been exchanged for shares of Travelzoo Inc. Prior to that date, the remaining shares which were available for issuance pursuant to the merger agreement were included in the issued and outstanding common stock of Travelzoo Inc. and included in the calculation of basic and diluted earnings per share. After April 25, 2004, the Company ceased issuing shares to the former stockholders of Travelzoo.com Corporation, and no additional shares are reserved for issuance to any former stockholders, because their right to receive shares has now expired. On April 25, 2004, the number of shares reported as outstanding was reduced from 19,425,147 to 15,309,615 to reflect actual shares issued as of the expiration date. Earnings per share calculations reflect this reduction of the number of shares reported as outstanding. As of December 31, 2012, there were 15,361,873 shares of common stock outstanding.
On April 21, 2011, the Company entered into an agreement with the State of Delaware resolving all claims relating to an unclaimed property review which began in 2010. The primary issue raised in the preliminary findings from the review, received by the Company on April 12, 2011, concerned the shares of Travelzoo which have not been claimed by former Netsurfer stockholders of Travelzoo.com as discussed in the preceding paragraph. In the preliminary findings under the unclaimed property review, up to 3.0 million shares were identified as “demandable” under Delaware escheat laws. While the Company continues to take the position that such shares were a promotional incentive and were issuable only to persons who establish their eligibility as stockholders, the Company determined that it was in its best interest to promptly resolve all claims relating to the unclaimed property review. The Company made a $20.0 million cash payment to the State of Delaware on April 27, 2011 and received a complete release of those claims. Since March 2012, similar claims have been asserted by other states. See Note 1 to the accompanying consolidated financial statements for further information on the unexchanged promotional merger shares contingency.
Travelzoo is listed on the NASDAQ Global Select Market under the symbol “TZOO.”

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Our Industry
While our mission is to provide our subscribers and users the highest quality information about the best travel, entertainment and local deals, our revenues are generated from advertising fees. According to Kantar Media, travel companies in the U.S. spent $3.3 billion in 2012 on advertising (source: Kantar Media, 2012). According to BIA Advisory Services and The Kelsey Group's U.S. Local Media Annual Forecast (2008-2013), U.S. local advertising revenues will be $144.4 billion in 2013 (source: BIA Advisory Services/The Kelsey Group, 2009). We believe that traditional media outlets such as newspapers, television and radio continue to be another medium for travel, entertainment and local businesses to advertise their offers, though the percentage spent on advertising in these traditional media outlets is decreasing. In addition, the continued rise in smart phones, has changed the ground rules for online marketing, with the consumption of online advertising rapidly moving to mobile devices. eMarketer anticipates that overall spending on mobile advertising in the United States, including display, search and messaging-based ads served to mobile phones and tablets, will rise to $4 billion in 2012 (a 180% increase over 2011), $7.19 billion in 2013, and nearly $21 billion by 2016.
We believe that several factors are causing and will continue to cause travel, entertainment and local businesses to increase their spending on Internet and mobile advertising of offers:
The Internet Is Consumers' Preferred Information Source. Market research shows that the Internet has become consumers' preferred information source for travel (source: Forrester's North American Technographics Travel Online Survey, Q1 2008).
Benefits of Internet Advertising vs. Print, TV and Radio Advertising. Internet advertising provides advertisers advantages compared to traditional advertising. These advantages include real-time listings, real-time updates, and performance tracking. See “- Benefits to Travel, Entertainment and Local Businesses” below.
New Advertising Opportunities. The Internet allows advertisers to advertise their sales and specials in a fast, flexible, and cost-effective manner that has not been possible before.
Suppliers Selling Directly. We believe that many travel suppliers prefer to sell directly to consumers through suppliers' websites versus selling through travel agents. Internet advertising attracts consumers to suppliers' websites.
Mobile advertising extends our products and services by providing mobile-specific features to mobile device users. Mobile advertising is still in its early stage, though mobile devices are quickly becoming the world's newest gateway for information. We are focused on developing easy-to-use mobile applications to help advertisers extend their reach, help create revenue opportunities for our customers, and deliver relevant and useful ads to users on the go. We continue to invest in improving users' access to our services through such devices.

Problems Travel, Entertainment and Local Businesses Face and Limitations of Newspaper, TV and Radio Advertising
We believe that travel, entertainment and local businesses often face the challenge of being able to effectively and quickly market and sell their excess inventory (i.e. airline seats, hotel rooms, cruise cabins, theater seats, spa appointments or restaurant seats that are likely to be unfilled). The success of marketing excess inventory can have a substantial impact on a company's profitability. Almost all costs of these services are fixed. That is, the costs do not vary significantly with sales. A relatively small amount of unsold inventory can have a significant impact on the profitability of a company.
We believe that travel, entertainment and local businesses need a fast, flexible, and cost-effective solution for marketing excess inventory. The solution must be fast, because services are a quickly expiring commodity. The period between the time when a company realizes that there is excess inventory and the time when the service has become worthless is very short. The solution must be flexible, because the demand for excess inventory is difficult to forecast. It is difficult for travel, entertainment and local businesses to price excess inventory and to forecast the marketing effort needed to sell excess inventory. The marketing must be cost-effective, because excess inventory is often sold at highly discounted prices, which lowers margins.
We believe that newspaper, TV and radio advertising, with respect to advertising excess inventory, suffers from a number of limitations which do not apply to the Internet:
typically, ads must be submitted 2 to 5 days prior to the publication or airing date, which makes it difficult to advertise last-minute inventory;
once an ad is published, it cannot be updated or deleted when an offer is sold out;
once an ad is published, the company cannot change a price or offer;
in many markets, the small number of newspapers, television companies, radio stations and other print media reduces competition, resulting in high rates for traditional advertising; and

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offline advertising does not allow for detailed performance tracking;
creative can be very expensive to develop.
Our Products and Services
We provide airlines, hotels, cruise lines, vacation packagers, other travel suppliers, entertainment and local businesses with a fast, flexible, and cost-effective way to reach millions of Internet users. Our publications include the Travelzoo websites, the Travelzoo Top 20 e-mail newsletter, the Newsflash e-mail alert service, and the Local Deals and Getaway e-mail alert services. We operate SuperSearch, a pay-per-click travel search tool and the Travelzoo Network, a network of third-party websites that list deals published by Travelzoo. We also operate Fly.com, a travel search engine that enables users to find and compare the best flight options from multiple sources, including airline and online travel agency websites. While our products provide advertising opportunities for travel, entertainment and local businesses, they also provide Internet users with a free source of information on current sales and specials from thousands of travel, entertainment and local businesses.
As travel, entertainment and local businesses increasingly utilize the Internet to promote their offers, we believe that our products will enable them to take advantage of the lower cost and real-time communication enabled by the Internet. Our listing management software allows our advertisers to add, update, and delete special offer listings on a real-time basis. Our software also provides our advertisers with real-time performance tracking, enabling them to optimize their marketing campaigns. Mobile advertising extends our products and services by providing mobile-specific features to mobile device users. We are focused on developing easy-to-use mobile applications to help advertisers extend their reach, help create revenue opportunities for our customers, and deliver relevant and useful ads to users on the go. We continue to invest in improving users' access to our services through such devices. In addition, we are beginning to develop a hotel booking platform that will facilitate our users to more easily book stays at hotel deals we present on our website and mobile devices.



























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The following table presents an overview of our products:
Product
 
 
Content
 
 
Publication
Schedule 
 
 
Reach/Usage*
 
 
Advertiser Benefits
 
 
Consumer Benefits
 
Travelzoo websites
 
Websites in the U.S., Canada, France, Germany, Spain, and the U.K. listing thousands of outstanding sales and specials from more than 2,000 travel, entertainment and local businesses
 
24/7
 
13.2 million unique visitors per month
 
Broad reach, sustained exposure, targeted placements by destination and travel segment
 
24/7 access to deals, ability to search and browse by destination or keyword
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Travelzoo Top 20
 
Popular e-mail newsletter listing 20 of the week's most outstanding deals
 
Weekly
 
22.5 million subscribers
 
Mass “push” advertising vehicle to quickly stimulate incremental travel and entertainment purchases
 
Weekly access to 20 outstanding, handpicked deals chosen from among thousands
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Newsflash
 
Regionally-targeted e-mail alert service with a single time-sensitive and newsworthy travel and entertainment offer
 
Within two
hours of an
offer being
identified
 
20.1 million subscribers
 
Regional targeting, 100% share of voice for advertiser, flexible publication schedule
 
Breaking news offers delivered just-in-time
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Local Deals and Getaway
 
Locally-targeted e-mail alert service with a single time-sensitive and newsworthy offer from local merchants such as spas and restaurants
 
Twice per
week in
active
markets
 
Over 155 markets
 
Local targeting by zip code,100% share of voice for the local businesses, flexible publication schedule
 
Breaking news offers delivered just-in-time
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Travelzoo Network
 
A network of third-party websites that list outstanding deals published by Travelzoo
 
24/7
 
Over 351 third-party websites
 
Drives qualified users with substantial distribution beyond the Travelzoo audience
 
Contextually relevant travel deals that have been handpicked and professionally reviewed
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
SuperSearch
 
Travel search tool using a proprietary algorithm to recommend sites and enable one-click searching
 
On-demand
 
5.1 million monthly searches
 
Drives qualified traffic directly to advertiser site on a pay-per-click basis
 
Saves time and money by recommending the sites most likely to have great rates for a specific itinerary
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Fly.com
 
Travel search engine that enables users to find and compare the best flight, hotel and rental car options from multiple sources
 
On-demand
 
3.5 million monthly searches
 
Provides advertisers a low cost distribution channel and retention of the user engagement on the advertiser's website
 
Free access to real-time price comparisons from airlines and online travel agencies
 
*
For Travelzoo websites, reach information is based on data from Google Analytics. For Top 20, Newsflash, Local Deals and Getaway, Travelzoo Network, SuperSearch, and Fly.com, reach/usage information is based on internal Travelzoo statistics as of December 31, 2012.
In 2012, 72% of our total revenues were generated from our North America operations, and 28% of our total revenues were generated from our European operations. See Note 8 to the accompanying consolidated financial statements.

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Benefits to Travel, Entertainment and local businesses
Key features of our solution for travel and entertainment companies include:
Real-Time Listings of Special Offers. Our technology allows travel and entertainment companies to advertise special offers on a real-time basis.
Real-Time Updates. Our technology allows travel and entertainment companies to update their listings on a real-time basis.
Real-Time Performance Reports. We provide travel and entertainment companies with real-time tracking of the performance of their advertising campaigns. Our solution enables travel and entertainment companies to optimize their campaigns by removing or updating unsuccessful listings and further promote successful listings.
Access to Millions of Consumers. We provide travel and entertainment companies fast access to over 26 million travel shoppers.
Global Reach. We offer access to Internet users across the U.S., Canada, France, Germany, Spain, and the U.K.
Key features of our solution for local businesses include:
Real-Time Listings of Special Offers. Our technology allows local businesses to advertise special offers on a real-time basis.
Real-Time Performance Reports. We provide local businesses with real-time tracking of the performance of their advertising campaigns.
Access to Local Consumers. Travelzoo subscribers submit their zip code to Travelzoo when they join Travelzoo. As a result, we are able to send Local Deals to subscribers who live or work near the local businesses.
Benefits to Consumers
Our Travelzoo websites (www.travelzoo.com, www.travelzoo.ca, ww.travelzoo.co.uk, www.travelzoo.de, www.travelzoo.es, www.travelzoo.fr, among others), Travelzoo Top 20 e-mail newsletter, Newsflash, Local Deals, Getaway, the Travelzoo Network, SuperSearch search tool, and Fly.com search engine provide consumers information on current offers at no cost to the consumer. Key features of our products include:
Aggregation of Offers from Many Companies. Our Travelzoo websites and our Travelzoo Top 20 e-mail newsletter aggregate information on current offers from more than 2,000 travel, entertainment and local businesses. This saves the consumer time when searching for travel, entertainment and local deals, sales and specials.
Current Information. Compared to newspaper, TV or radio advertisements, we provide consumers more current information, since our technology enables travel, entertainment and local businesses to update their listings on a real-time basis.
Reliable Information. We operate a Test Booking Center® to check the availability of travel, entertainment and local deals included in the Travelzoo Top 20 before publishing.
Search Tools. We provide consumers with the ability to search for specific offers.
Growth Strategy
Key elements of our strategy include:
Build Strong Brand Awareness. We believe that it is essential to establish a strong brand with Internet users and within the travel industry, entertainment industry and with local businesses. We currently utilize online marketing and direct marketing to promote our brand to consumers. We utilize sponsorships at industry conferences and public relations to promote our brand. In addition, we believe that we build brand awareness through product excellence which leads to word-of-mouth referrals. We believe it is important that we develop new products that keep pace with changes in consumer preference and technology, such as the trend towards mobile usage by consumers, as well as facilitating hotel booking for consumers.
Increase Reach. In order to attract more users to our products, we intend to expand our advertising campaigns as our business grows. We believe that we also can attract more users through product excellence that is promoted by word-of-mouth.
Quality User Base. We believe that, in addition to increasing our reach, we need to maintain the quality of our user base. We believe that high quality content attracts a quality user base.
Increase Number of Advertisers: We intend to continue to grow our advertiser base by expanding the size of our sales force and by entering into new content categories such as restaurants and spas. See “- Sales and Marketing” below.

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Excellent Service. We believe that it is important to provide our advertisers and users with excellent service.
Replicate Business Model in Foreign Markets. We have replicated our business model in foreign markets including Canada, the U.K., Germany, France and Spain. We believe that there is an opportunity to replicate our business model in additional foreign markets. In addition, we believe that we can strengthen our strategic position if we offer global advertising solutions to existing and new advertisers.
Advertisers
As of December 31, 2012, our advertiser base included more than 2,000 travel, entertainment and local businesses, including airlines, hotels, cruise lines, vacations packagers, tour operators, destinations, car rental companies, travel agents, theater and performing arts groups, restaurants, spas, and activity companies. Some of our advertisers are:
Air New Zealand
Interstate Hotels & Resort
Atlantis
Jet Luxury Resorts
Apple Vacations
Key Tours International
British Airways
Liberty Travel
CheapTickets
Lufthansa
Cirque du Soleil
Marriott Hotels
Delta Air Lines
Orbitz Worldwide
Expedia
Royal Caribbean
Fairmont Hotels and Resorts
Spirit Airlines
Fareportal
Starwood Hotels & Resorts Worldwide
Harrah's Entertainment
Travelocity
Hawaiian Airlines
United Airlines
Hilton Hotels
Virgin America
Hotwire
Virgin Atlantic
InterContinental Hotels Group
Walt Disney Parks & Resorts
As discussed in Note 8 to the accompanying consolidated financial statements, we did not have any advertisers that accounted for 10% or more of our total revenues during the years ended December 31, 2012, 2011 and 2010. The agreements with these advertisers are in the form of multiple insertion orders and merchant agreements from groups of entities under common control. It is possible that we may have an advertiser or advertisers that account for 10% or more of our total revenues in future years because management believes there is a high concentration in the online travel agency industry.
Sales and Marketing
As of December 31, 2012, our advertising sales force and sales support staff consisted of 151 employees worldwide. We intend to grow our advertiser base by expanding the size of our sales force.
We currently utilize online marketing and direct marketing to promote our brand to consumers. In addition, we utilize an online marketing program to acquire new subscribers for our e-mail publications. We believe that we build brand awareness by product excellence that is promoted by word-of-mouth. We utilize sponsorships at industry conferences and public relations to promote our brands.
Technology
We have designed our technology to serve a large volume of Web traffic and send a large volume of e-mails in an efficient and scalable manner.
We co-locate our production servers with Equinix, Inc. (“Equinix”), a global provider of hosting, network, and application services. Equinix's facilities include features such as power redundancy, multiple egress and peering to other ISPs, fire suppression and access to our own separate physical space. We believe our arrangements with Equinix will allow us to grow without being limited by our own physical and technological capacity, and will also provide us with sufficient bandwidth for our anticipated needs. Because of the design of our websites, our users are not required to download or upload large files from or to our websites, which allows us to continue increasing the number of our visitors and page views without adversely affecting our performance or requiring us to make significant additional capital expenditures.

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Our software is written using widely used standards, such as Visual Basic Script, and HTML, and interfaces with products from Microsoft and ITA software. We have generally standardized our hardware platform on HP servers and Cisco switches.
Competition
We compete for advertising dollars with large Internet portal sites such as MSN and Yahoo! that offer listings or other advertising opportunities to travel, entertainment and local businesses. We compete with search engines like Google and Bing that offer pay-per-click listings. We compete with travel meta-search engines like Kayak and online travel and entertainment deal publishers. We compete with large online travel agencies like Expedia and Priceline that also offer advertising placements and capture consumer interest. We compete with companies like Groupon and LivingSocial that sell vouchers for deals from local businesses such as spas, hotels, restaurants and activity companies. We expect to face increased competition from other Internet and technology-based businesses such as Google and Microsoft, each of which has launched initiatives which are directly competitive to our Local Deals and Getaway products. In addition, we compete with newspapers, magazines and other traditional media companies that operate websites which provide advertising opportunities. We expect to face additional competition as other established and emerging companies, including print media companies, enter our market. We believe that the primary competitive factors are price, performance and audience quality.
Many of our current and potential competitors have longer operating histories, significantly greater financial, technical, marketing and other resources and larger advertiser bases than we do. In addition, current and potential competitors may make strategic acquisitions or establish cooperative relationships to expand their businesses or to offer more comprehensive solutions.
New technologies could increase the competitive pressures that we face. The development of competing technologies by market participants or the emergence of new industry standards may adversely affect our competitive position. Competition could result in reduced margins on our services, loss of market share or less use of our products by our advertisers and consumers. If we are not able to compete effectively with current or future competitors as a result of these and other factors, our business could be materially adversely affected.
Government Regulation and Legal Uncertainties
There are increasing numbers of laws and regulations pertaining to the Internet, including laws and regulations relating to user privacy, liability for information retrieved from or transmitted over the Internet, online content regulation, and domain name registration. Moreover, the applicability to the Internet of existing laws governing issues such as intellectual property ownership and infringement, copyright, patent, trademark, trade secret, obscenity, libel and personal privacy is uncertain and developing.
Privacy Concerns. Government agencies are considering adopting regulations regarding the collection and use of personal identifying information obtained from individuals when using Internet sites or e-mail services. While we have implemented and intend to implement additional programs designed to enhance the protection of the privacy of our users, these programs may not conform to any regulations which may be adopted by these agencies. In addition, these regulatory and enforcement efforts may adversely affect our ability to collect demographic and personal information from users, which could have an adverse effect on our ability to provide advertisers with demographic information. The European Union (the “EU”) has adopted a directive that imposes restrictions on the collection and use of personal data. The directive could impose restrictions that are more stringent than current Internet privacy standards in the U.S. The directive may adversely affect our operations in Europe.
Anti-Spam Legislation. The CAN-SPAM Act, a federal anti-spam law, pre-empts various state anti-spam laws and establishes a single standard for e-mail marketing and customer communications. We believe that this law, on an overall basis, benefits our business as we do not use spam techniques or practices and may benefit now that others are prohibited from doing so.
Domain Names. Domain names are the user's Internet “addresses.” The current system for registering, allocating and managing domain names has been the subject of litigation and of proposed regulatory reform. We have registered travelzoo.com, travelzoo.ca, travelzoo.co.jp, travelzoo.com.au, travelzoo.com.tw, travelzoo.co.uk, travelzoo.de, travelzoo.fr, travelzoo.org, travelzoo.net, weekend.com, and weekends.com, among other domain names, and have registered “Travelzoo” as a trademark in the United States, Canada, the EU, and in various countries in Asia Pacific. In January 2009, we purchased the domain name Fly.com. Because of these protections, it is unlikely, yet possible, that third parties may bring claims for infringement against us for the use of our domain name and trademark. In the event such claims are successful, we could lose the ability to use our domain names. There can be no assurance that our domain names will not lose their value, or that we will not have to obtain entirely new domain names in addition to or in lieu of our current domain names if changes in overall Internet domain name rules result in a restructuring in the current system of using domain names which include “.com,” “.net,” “.gov,” “.edu” and other extensions.

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Jurisdictions. Due to the global nature of the Internet, it is possible that, although our transmissions over the Internet originate primarily in California, the governments of other states and foreign countries might attempt to regulate our business activities. In addition, because our service is available over the Internet in multiple states and foreign countries, these jurisdictions may require us to qualify to do business as a foreign corporation in each of these states or foreign countries, which could subject us to additional taxes and other regulations.
Intellectual Property
Our success depends to a significant degree upon the protection of our brand names, including Travelzoo® and Top 20®. If we were unable to protect the Travelzoo and Top 20 brand names, our business could be materially adversely affected. We rely upon a combination of copyright, trade secret and trademark laws to protect our intellectual property rights. We have registered the Travelzoo and Top 20 trademarks, among others, with the United States Patent and Trademark Office. We have registered the Travelzoo and Travelzoo Top 20 trademarks with the Office for Harmonization in the Internal Market of the European Community. We have registered the Travelzoo trademark in Australia, Canada, China, Hong Kong, Japan, South Korea, and Taiwan. The steps we have taken to protect our proprietary rights, however, may not be adequate to deter misappropriation of proprietary information.
We may not be able to detect unauthorized use of our proprietary information or take appropriate steps to enforce our intellectual property rights. In addition, the validity, enforceability and scope of protection of intellectual property in Internet-related industries are uncertain and still evolving. The laws of other countries in which we may market our services in the future are uncertain and may afford little or no effective protection of our intellectual property.
Employees
As of December 31, 2012, we had 417 employees in Europe and North America. None of our employees are represented under collective bargaining agreements. We consider our relations with our employees to be good. Because of our anticipated continued growth, we expect that the number of our employees will continue to increase for the foreseeable future.
Internet Access to Other Information
We make available free of charge, on or through our website (www.travelzoo.com), annual reports on Form 10-K, quarterly reports on Form 10-Q and current reports on Form 8-K and amendments to those reports filed or furnished pursuant to Section 13(a) or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as well as proxy statements, as soon as reasonably practicable after we electronically file such material with, or furnish it to, the SEC. Information included on our website does not constitute part of this Report.
Item 1A. Risk Factors
Investing in our common stock involves a high degree of risk. Any or all of the risks listed below as well as other variables affecting our operating results could have a material adverse effect on our business, our quarterly and annual operating results or financial condition, which could cause the market price of our stock to decline or cause substantial volatility in our stock price, in which event the value of your common stock could decline. You should also keep these risk factors in mind when you read forward-looking statements.
Risks Related to Our Financial Condition and Business Model
We cannot assure you that we will be profitable.
In the years ended December 31, 2012, 2011 and 2010, we generated a net income of $18.2 million, $3.3 million and $13.2 million. Although we were profitable in 2012, 2011 and 2010, there is no assurance that we will continue to be profitable in the future. We forecast our future expense levels based on our operating plans and our estimates of future revenues. We may find it necessary to significantly accelerate expenditures relating to our sales and marketing efforts or otherwise increase our financial commitment to creating and maintaining brand awareness among Internet users and advertisers. If our revenues grow at a slower rate than we anticipate, or if our spending levels exceed our expectations or cannot be adjusted to reflect slower revenue growth, we may not generate sufficient revenues to be profitable. Any of these developments could result in a significant decrease in the trading price of our common stock.
Fluctuations in our operating results may negatively impact our stock price.
Our quarterly and annual operating results may fluctuate significantly in the future due to a variety of factors that could affect our revenues or our expenses in any particular period. You should not rely on quarter-to-quarter comparisons of our results of operations as an indication of future performance. Factors that may affect our quarterly results include:

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mismatches between resource allocation and client demand due to difficulties in predicting client demand in a new market;
changes in general economic conditions that could affect marketing efforts generally and online marketing efforts in particular;
the magnitude and timing of marketing initiatives, including our acquisition of new subscribers and our expansion efforts in other regions;
the introduction, development, timing, competitive pricing and market acceptance of our products and services and those of our competitors;
our ability to attract and retain key personnel;
our ability to manage our anticipated growth and expansion;
our ability to attract traffic to our websites;
technical difficulties or system downtime affecting the Internet generally or the operation of our products and services specifically;
payments which we may make to previous stockholders of Travelzoo.com Corporation who failed to submit requests for shares in Travelzoo Inc. within the required time period, or escheat claims related to shares not issued in the Company’s merger with Travelzoo.com Corporation; and
volatility of our operating results in new markets.
We may significantly increase our operating expenses related to advertising campaigns for the Travelzoo and Fly.com brands for a certain period if we see a unique opportunity for a brand marketing campaign, if we find it necessary to respond to increased brand marketing by a competitor, or if we decide to accelerate our acquisition of new subscribers.
If revenues fall below our expectations in any quarter and we are unable to quickly reduce our operating expenses in response, our operating results would be lower than expected and our stock price may fall.

Our expansion of our product offering to include Local Deals and Getaway formats and the addition of a hotel booking platform may result in additional costs that exceed revenue and may trigger additional stock volatility.
During the third quarter of 2010, we launched our Local Deals format of advertising and during the second quarter of 2011, we launched our Getaway format of advertising, under which we sell vouchers directly to consumers to advertise promotional deals provided by merchants. For example, a consumer could buy a voucher for $99 for a dinner for two at a merchant’s restaurant that would normally be valued at $199, representing a promotional value of $100 to the consumer. This format involves several aspects that are new to us, and will require investments to maintain and grow the business including additional sales force hiring, building a customer service organization, marketing, technology tracking systems and payment processing. This format, introduced to the market in recent years, has resulted in many competitors entering the marketplace, thereby creating a very competitive marketplace. This competitive landscape along with the required investments to start, maintain and grow this format create a risk that our costs may exceed our revenues in the short and long term, which may materially impact our results of operation and financial condition. Operating this format may introduce additional volatility to our stock price due to the performance of this format by the Company and/or the overall market valuations that are being determined by the market for companies operating this format of advertising. In addition, our plan to add a hotel booking platform which may result in an increase in costs to develop the platform in the near-term and an increase in cost structure in the long-term, which may be in excess of incremental revenue.

We may have exposure to additional tax liabilities.    

As an international company providing online advertising services, we are subject to income taxes as well as non-income based taxes, in both the United States and various foreign jurisdictions. Significant judgment is required in determining our worldwide provision for income taxes and other tax liabilities. Although we believe that our tax estimates are reasonable, there is no assurance that the final determination of tax audits or tax disputes will not be different from what is reflected in our historical income tax provisions and accruals. Changes in tax laws or tax rulings may have a significantly adverse impact on our effective tax rate.

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We are also subject to non-income based taxes, such as value-added, payroll, sales, use, net worth, property and goods and services taxes, in both the United States and various foreign jurisdictions. From time to time, we are under audit by tax authorities with respect to these non-income based taxes and may have exposure to additional non-income based tax liabilities.
Adverse application of state and local tax laws could have an adverse effect on our business and results of operation.
Our expansion of our product offering to include a hotel booking platform may subject us to state and local tax laws and result in additional tax liabilities. A number of jurisdictions in the United States have initiated lawsuits against other on-line travel companies, related to, among other things, the payment of hotel occupancy and other taxes (i.e., state and local sales tax). In addition, a number of municipalities have initiated audit proceedings, issued proposed tax assessments or started inquiries relating to the payment of hotel occupancy and other taxes.
To the extent that any tax authority succeeds in asserting that we have a tax collection responsibility, or we determine that we have one, with respect to future transactions, we may collect any such additional tax obligation from our customers, which would have the effect of increasing the cost of hotel room reservations to our customers and, consequently, could make our hotel service less competitive (i.e., versus the websites of other online travel companies or hotel company websites) and reduce hotel reservation transactions; alternatively, we could choose to reduce the compensation for our services on "merchant" hotel transactions. Either step could have a material adverse effect on our business and results of operations. We will continue to assess the risks of the potential financial impact of additional tax exposure, and to the extent appropriate, we will reserve for those estimates of liabilities.
Our business model may not be adaptable to a changing market.
Our current revenue model depends primarily on advertising fees paid by travel and entertainment companies. If current clients decide not to continue advertising their offers with us and we are unable to replace them with new clients, our business may be adversely affected. To be successful, we must provide online marketing solutions that achieve broad market acceptance by travel and entertainment companies. In addition, we must attract sufficient Internet users with attractive demographic characteristics to our products. It is possible that we will be required to further adapt our business model and products in response to changes in the online advertising market or if our current business model is not successful. For example, the trend toward mobile online traffic will require us to adapt our product offering to facilitate consumers use of our products. If we do not adapt to this trend fully or quickly enough, we may lose advertising revenue as consumer usage may decline from our non-mobile traffic. If we are not able to anticipate changes in the online advertising market or if our business model is not successful, our business could be materially adversely affected.
If we fail to retain existing advertisers or add new advertisers, our revenue and business will be harmed.
We depend on our ability to attract and retain advertisers (hotels, spas, restaurants, vacation packagers, airlines, etc.) that are prepared to offer products or services on compelling terms to our subscribers. We do not have long-term arrangements to guarantee the availability of deals that offer attractive quality, value and variety to consumers or favorable payment terms to us. We must continue to attract and retain advertisers in order to increase revenue and maintain profitability. If new advertisers do not find our marketing and promotional services effective, or if existing advertisers do not believe that utilizing our products provides them with a long-term increase in customers, revenue or profit, they may stop making offers through our marketplace. In addition, we may experience attrition in our advertisers in the ordinary course of business resulting from several factors, including losses to competitors and advertiser closures or bankruptcies. If we are unable to attract new advertisers in numbers sufficient to grow our business, or if too many advertisers are unwilling to offer products or services with compelling terms to our subscribers or offer favorable payment terms to us, we may sell less advertising, and our operating results will be adversely affected. For example, we may lose advertisers due to market conditions or performance, such as our recent loss of revenue from certain online booking engines, airlines and vacation packagers. We may not add enough additional revenue, such as hotel revenue from Getaway or the planned hotel booking platform, in order to replace the lost revenue. Furthermore, the new revenue may cost more to generate compared to the costs that the lost revenue required to generate, thereby adversely impacting our operating results.
Our existing advertisers may shift from one advertising service to another, which may adversely affect our revenue.
Existing advertisers may shift from one advertising service (e.g. Top 20) to another (e.g. Local Deals and Getaway). These shifts between advertising services by advertisers could result in no incremental revenue or less revenue than in previous periods depending on the amount purchased by the advertisers, and in particular with Local Deals and Getaway, depending on how many vouchers are purchased by subscribers. In addition, we are anticipating a shift from our existing hotel revenue to commission-based revenue as we obtain the hotel booking platform capabilities, which may result in lower revenue depending on volume of hotel bookings.

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An increase in our refund rates related to our Local Deals and Getaway could reduce our liquidity and profitability.
We provide refunds related to our Local Deals and Getaway voucher sales. As we increase our revenue, our refund rates may exceed our historical levels. A downturn in general economic conditions may also increase our refund rates. An increase in our refund rates could significantly reduce our liquidity and profitability.
As we do not have control over our merchants and the quality of products or services they deliver, we rely on a combination of our historical experience with our merchants over time and the type of refunds provided for development of our estimate for refund claims. Our actual level of refund claims could prove to be greater than the level of refund claims we estimate. If our refund reserves are not adequate to cover future refund claims, this inadequacy could have a material adverse effect on our liquidity and profitability.
Our standard agreements with our merchants generally limit the time period during which we may seek reimbursement for subscriber refunds or claims. Our subscribers may make claims for refunds with respect to which we are unable to seek reimbursement from our merchants. Our inability to seek reimbursement from our merchants for refund claims could have an adverse effect on our liquidity and profitability.

If our advertisers do not meet the needs and expectations of our subscribers, our business could suffer.
Our business depends on our reputation for providing high-quality deals, and our brand and reputation may be harmed by actions taken by advertisers that are outside our control. In particular, this is the case with our Local Deals and Getaway merchants, since we are selling vouchers on behalf of the merchants directly to our subscribers as opposed to the remainder of our business in which we are only collecting the advertising fee from the advertiser and the subscribers are booking the deal directly with the advertiser. Any shortcomings of one or more of our merchants, particularly with respect to an issue affecting the quality of the deal offered or the products or services sold, may be attributed by our subscribers to us, thus damaging our reputation, brand value and potentially affecting our results of operations. In addition, negative publicity and subscriber sentiment generated as a result of fraudulent or deceptive conduct by our merchants could damage our reputation, reduce our ability to attract new subscribers or retain our current subscribers, and diminish the value of our brand.
Our business relies heavily on e-mail and other messaging services, and any restrictions on the sending of e-mails or messages or a decrease in subscriber willingness to receive messages could adversely affect our revenue and business.
Our business is highly dependent upon e-mail and other messaging services. Deals offered through e-mails and other messages sent by us, or on our behalf by our affiliates, generate a substantial portion of our revenue. Because of the importance of e-mail and other messaging services to our businesses, if we are unable to successfully deliver e-mails or messages to our subscribers or potential subscribers, or if subscribers decline to open our e-mails or messages, our revenue and profitability would be adversely affected. Actions by third parties to block, impose restrictions on, or charge for the delivery of, e-mails or other messages could also materially and adversely impact our business. From time to time, Internet service providers block bulk e-mail transmissions or otherwise experience technical difficulties that result in our inability to successfully deliver e-mails or other messages to third parties. In addition, our use of e-mail and other messaging services to send communications about our website or other matters may result in legal claims against us, which if successful might limit or prohibit our ability to send e-mails or other messages. Any disruption or restriction on the distribution of e-mails or other messages or any increase in the associated costs would materially and adversely affect our revenue and profitability.
Our reported total number of subscribers may be higher than the number of our actual individual subscribers and may not be representative of the number of persons who are active potential customers.
The total number of subscribers we report may be higher than the number of our actual individual subscribers because some subscribers have multiple registrations, other subscribers have died or become incapacitated and others may have registered under fictitious names. Given the challenges inherent in identifying these subscribers, we do not have a reliable system to accurately identify the number of actual individual subscribers, and thus we rely on the number of total subscribers shown on our records as our measure of the size of our subscriber base. In addition, the number of subscribers we report includes the total number of individuals that have completed registration through a specific date, less individuals who have unsubscribed. Those numbers may include individuals who do not receive our e-mails because our e-mails have been blocked or are otherwise undeliverable. As a result, the reported number of subscribers should not be considered as representative of the number of persons who continue to actively consider our deals by reviewing our e-mail offers.

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We may not be able to obtain sufficient funds to grow our business and any additional financing may be on terms adverse to your interests.
For the year ended December 31, 2012, our cash and cash equivalents increased by $22.4 million to $61.2 million. We intend to continue to grow our business and fund our current operations using cash on hand. However, this may not be sufficient to meet our needs. We may not be able to obtain financing on commercially reasonable terms, or at all.
If additional financing is not available when required or is not available on acceptable terms, we may be unable to fund our expansion, successfully promote our brand name, develop or enhance our products and services, take advantage of business opportunities, or respond to competitive pressures, any of which could have a material adverse effect on our business.
If we choose to raise additional funds through the issuance of equity securities, you may experience significant dilution of your ownership interest and holders of the additional equity securities may have rights senior to those of the holders of our common stock. If we obtain additional financing by issuing debt securities or bank borrowings, the terms of these arrangements could restrict or prevent us from paying dividends and could limit our flexibility in making business decisions.

Our business may be sensitive to recessions.
The demand for online advertising may be linked to the level of economic activity and employment in the U.S. and abroad. Specifically, our business is primarily dependent on the demand for online advertising from travel and entertainment companies. The recent recession decreased consumer travel and caused travel and entertainment companies to reduce or postpone their marketing spending generally, and their online marketing spending in particular. Continued or future recessions could have a material adverse effect on our business and financial condition.
Our operations could be significantly hindered by the occurrence of a natural disaster or other catastrophic event.
Our operations are susceptible to outages due to fire, floods, power loss, telecommunications failures, unexpected technical problems in the systems that power our websites and distribute our e-mail newsletters, break-ins and similar events. In addition, a significant portion of our network infrastructure is located in Northern California, an area susceptible to earthquakes. We do not have multiple site capacity to protect us against any such occurrence. Outages could cause significant interruptions of our service. In addition, despite our implementation of network security measures, our servers are vulnerable to computer viruses, physical and electronic break-ins, and similar disruptions from unauthorized tampering with our computer systems. We do not carry business interruption insurance to compensate us for losses that may occur as a result of any of these events.
Technological or other assaults on our service could harm our business.
We are vulnerable to coordinated attempts to overload our systems with data, which could result in denial or reduction of service to some or all of our users for a period of time. We have experienced denial of service attacks in the past, and may experience such attempts in the future. Any such event could reduce our revenue and harm our operating results and financial condition. We do not carry business interruption insurance to compensate us for losses that may occur as a result of any of these events.
We are subject to payments-related risks.
We accept payments for the sale of vouchers using a variety of methods, including credit cards and debit cards. We pay interchange and other fees, which may increase over time and raise our operating expenses and lower profitability. We rely on third parties to provide payment processing services, including the processing of credit cards and debit cards, and it could disrupt our business if these companies become unwilling or unable to provide these services to us. We are also subject to payment card association operating rules, certification requirements and rules governing electronic funds transfers, which could change or be reinterpreted to make it difficult or impossible for us to comply. Moreover, under payment card rules and our contracts with our card processors, if there is a security breach of payment card information that we store, we could be liable to the payment card issuing banks for their cost of issuing new cards and related expenses. If we fail to comply with these rules or requirements, we may be subject to fines and higher transaction fees and lose our ability to accept credit and debit card payments, process electronic funds transfers, or facilitate other types of online payments, and our business and results of operations could be adversely affected. If one or more of these contracts are terminated and we are unable to replace them on similar terms, or at all, it could adversely affect our results of operations.



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Risks Related to Our Markets and Strategy
Our international expansion may result in operating losses, and is subject to other material risks.
In May 2005, we began operations in the U.K. In 2006, we began operations in Canada, Germany, and Spain. In 2007, we began operations in France.
Although our revenues in Europe increased 6.5% in 2012 compared to 2011 and our operations in Europe generated a profit of $7.0 million in 2012 and a profit of $4.9 million in 2011, our operations in Europe incurred a loss of $1.8 million during the 2010 fiscal year, primarily as a result of significant expenses related to subscriber acquisition and the launch of Fly.com. We intend to continue adding a significant number of subscribers in selected countries in which we operate as we believe this is one of the factors that will allow us to increase our advertising rates and increase our revenues in Europe.
If we incur losses from our operations in Europe in the future, these losses may not have any recognizable tax benefit. We expect that this would have a material negative impact on our net income and cash flows. Any of these developments could result in a significant decrease in the trading price of our common stock. In addition to uncertainty about our ability to generate net income from our foreign operations and expand our international market position, there are certain risks inherent in doing business internationally, including:
trade barriers and changes in trade regulations;
difficulties in developing, staffing and simultaneously managing foreign operations as a result of distance, language and cultural differences;
stringent local labor laws and regulations;
currency exchange rate fluctuations;
risks related to government regulation; and
potentially adverse tax consequences.
If current economic conditions in Europe do not improve or deteriorate further due to the adverse effects of the ongoing sovereign debt crisis, advertisers may delay or reduce advertising or marketing spending. This could result in reductions in sales of our services, longer sales cycles, and increased price competition.
We may not be able to continue developing awareness of our brand names.
We believe that continuing to build awareness of the Travelzoo and Fly.com brand names is critical to achieving widespread acceptance of our business. Brand recognition is a key differentiating factor among providers of online advertising opportunities, and we believe it could become more important as competition in our industry increases. In order to maintain and build brand awareness, we must succeed in our marketing efforts. If we fail to successfully promote and maintain our brands, incur significant expenses in promoting our brands and fail to generate a corresponding increase in revenue as a result of our branding efforts, or encounter legal obstacles which prevent our continued use of our brand names, our business could be materially adversely affected.
If we fail to retain our existing subscribers or acquire new subscribers, our revenue and business will be harmed.
We spent $5.4 million, $7.6 million and $10.7 million on online marketing initiatives relating to subscriber acquisition for years ended December 31, 2012, 2011 and 2010 and expect to continue to spend significant amounts to acquire additional subscribers. We must continue to retain and acquire subscribers in order to maintain or increase revenue. We cannot assure you that the revenue from subscribers we acquire will ultimately exceed the cost of acquiring new subscribers. If subscribers do not perceive our offers to be of high value and quality or if we fail to introduce new and more relevant deals, we may not be able to acquire or retain subscribers. If we reduce our subscriber acquisition costs, we cannot assure you that this will not adversely impact our ability to acquire new subscribers. If we are unable to acquire new subscribers who purchase our deals directly or indirectly in numbers sufficient to grow our business, or if subscribers cease to purchase our deals directly or indirectly through our advertisers, the revenue we generate may decrease and our operating results will be adversely affected. If the level of usage by our subscriber base declines or does not grow as expected, we may suffer a decline in subscriber growth or revenue. A significant decrease in the level of usage or subscriber growth would have an adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

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Our business may be sensitive to events affecting the travel industry in general.
Events like the Middle East conflicts or the terrorist attacks on the U.S. in 2001 or the recent global financial crisis have a negative impact on the travel industry. We are not in a position to evaluate the net effect of these circumstances on our business. In the longer term, our business might be negatively affected by financial pressures on the travel industry. However, our business may also benefit if travel companies increase their efforts to promote special offers or other marketing programs. If such events result in a long-term negative impact on the travel industry, such impact could have a material adverse effect on our business.
We may not be able to attract travel and entertainment companies or Internet users if we do not continually enhance and develop the content and features of our products and services.
To remain competitive, we must continually improve the responsiveness, functionality, and features of our products and services. We may not succeed in developing features, functions, products, or services that travel and entertainment companies and Internet users find attractive. This could reduce the number of travel and entertainment companies and Internet users using our products and materially adversely affect our business.
We may lose business if we fail to keep pace with rapidly changing technologies and client needs.
Our success is dependent on our ability to develop new and enhanced software, services, and related products to meet rapidly evolving technological requirements for online advertising. Our current technology may not meet the future technical requirements of travel and entertainment companies. Trends that could have a critical impact on our success include:
rapidly changing technology in online advertising;
evolving industry standards, including both formal and de facto standards relating to online advertising;
developments and changes relating to the Internet;
competing products and services that offer increased functionality; and
changes in travel company, entertainment company, and Internet user requirements.
If we are unable to timely and successfully develop and introduce new products and enhancements to existing products in response to our industry’s changing technological requirements, our business could be materially adversely affected.
Our business and growth will suffer if we are unable to hire and retain highly skilled personnel.
Our future success depends on our ability to attract, train, motivate, and retain highly skilled employees. We may be unable to retain our skilled employees, or attract, assimilate, and retain other highly skilled employees in the future. We have from time to time in the past experienced, and we expect to continue to experience in the future, difficulty in hiring and retaining highly skilled employees with appropriate qualifications. If we are unable to hire and retain skilled personnel, our growth may be restricted, which could adversely affect our future success.
We may not be able to effectively manage our expanding operations.
Since the commencement of our operations, we have experienced a period of rapid growth. In order to execute our business plan, we must continue to grow significantly. As of December 31, 2012, we had 417 employees, up from 350 employees as of December 31, 2011. We expect that the number of our employees will continue to increase for the foreseeable future. This growth has placed, and our anticipated future growth will continue to place, a significant strain on our management, systems, and resources. We expect that we will need to continue to improve our financial and managerial controls and reporting systems and procedures. We will also need to continue to expand and maintain close coordination among our sales, production, marketing, IT, and finance departments. We may not succeed in these efforts. Our inability to expand our operations in an efficient manner could cause our expenses to grow disproportionately to revenues, our revenues to decline or grow more slowly than expected and could otherwise have a material adverse effect on our business. For example, during the three months ended December 31, 2012, we experienced a decline in our revenue disproportionate to our expenses.
Intense competition may adversely affect our ability to achieve or maintain market share and operate profitably.
We compete for advertising dollars with large Internet portal sites, such as MSN and Yahoo!, that offer listings or other advertising opportunities to travel, entertainment and local businesses. These companies have significantly greater financial, technical, marketing and other resources and larger advertiser bases. We compete with search engines like Google and Bing that offer pay-per-click listings. We compete with travel Metasearch engines like Kayak and online travel and entertainment deal

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publishers. We compete with large online travel agencies like Expedia and Priceline that also offer advertising placements and capture consumer interest. We compete with companies like Groupon and LivingSocial that sell vouchers for deals from local businesses such as spas, hotels and restaurants. We expect to face increased competition from other Internet and technology-based businesses such as Google and Microsoft, each of which has launched initiatives which are directly competitive to our Local Deals and Getaway products. Google has introduced their hotel search product which negatively impacted our ability to efficiently purchase Google hotel search traffic to drive our Search product revenues. We also have seen that some competitors will accept lower margins, or negative margins, to attract attention and acquire new subscribers. If competitors engage in group buying initiatives in which merchants receive a higher percentage of the face value than we currently offer, we may be forced to pay a higher percentage of the face value than we currently offer, which may reduce our revenue. In addition, we compete with newspapers, magazines and other traditional media companies that operate websites which provide online advertising opportunities. We expect to face additional competition as other established and emerging companies, including print media companies, enter the online advertising market. Competition could result in reduced margins on our services, loss of market share or less use of Travelzoo by advertisers and consumers. If we are not able to compete effectively with current or future competitors as a result of these and other factors, our business could be materially adversely affected.
Loss of any of our key management personnel could negatively impact our business.
Our future success depends to a significant extent on the continued service and coordination of our management team, particularly Christopher Loughlin, our Chief Executive Officer. The loss or departure of any of our officers or key employees could materially adversely affect our ability to implement our business plan. We do not maintain key person life insurance for any member of our management team. In addition, we expect new members to join our management team in the future. These individuals will not previously have worked together and will be required to become integrated into our management team. If our key management personnel are not able to work together effectively or successfully, our business could be materially adversely affected.
We may not be able to access third party technology upon which we depend.
We use technology and software products from third parties including Microsoft and ITA Software. Technology from our current or other vendors may not continue to be available to us on commercially reasonable terms, or at all. Our business will suffer if we are unable to access this technology, to gain access to additional products or to integrate new technology with our existing systems. This could cause delays in our development and introduction of new services and related products or enhancements of existing products until equivalent or replacement technology can be accessed, if available, or developed internally, if feasible. If we experience these delays, our business could be materially adversely affected.
Acquisitions, investments and joint ventures could result in operating difficulties, dilution, and other harmful consequences that may adversely impact our business and results of operations.
We may evaluate and consider a wide array of potential strategic transactions as part of our overall business strategy, including business combinations, acquisitions and dispositions of businesses, technologies, services, and other assets, as well as strategic investments and joint ventures. At any given time we may be engaged in discussions or negotiations with respect to one or more of these types of transactions. Any of these transactions could be material to our financial condition and results of operations.
These transactions involve significant challenges and risks. Some of the areas where we may face risks or difficulties include:

Diversion of management time and focus from operating our business to acquisition integration challenges.

Implementation or remediation of controls, procedures, and policies at the acquired company.

Integration of the acquired company's accounting, human resources, and other administrative systems, and coordination of product, engineering, and sales and marketing functions.

Transition of operations, users, and customers onto our existing platforms.


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Failure to obtain required approvals on a timely basis, if at all, from governmental authorities, or conditions placed upon approval, under competition and antitrust laws which could, among other things, delay or prevent us from completing a transaction, or otherwise restrict our ability to realize the expected financial or strategic goals of an acquisition.

In the case of foreign acquisitions, the need to integrate operations across different cultures and languages and to address the particular economic, currency, political, and regulatory risks associated with specific countries.

Failure to successfully further develop the acquired business or technology.

Cultural challenges associated with integrating employees from the acquired company into our organization, and retention of employees from the businesses we acquire.

Liability for activities of the acquired company before the acquisition, including patent and trademark infringement claims, violations of laws, commercial disputes, tax liabilities, and other known and unknown liabilities.

Litigation or other claims in connection with the acquired company, including claims from terminated employees, customers, former stockholders, or other third parties.

Challenges relating to the structure of an investment, such as governance, accountability and decision-making conflicts that may arise in the context of a joint venture.

Expected and unexpected costs incurred in pursuing acquisitions, including identifying and performing due diligence on potential acquisition targets that may or may not be successful.

Entrance into markets in which we have no direct prior experience and increased complexity in our business.

Inability to sell excess assets.

Impairment of goodwill and other assets acquired.

Our failure to address these risks or other problems encountered in connection with our past or future acquisitions and investments could cause us to fail to realize the anticipated benefits of such acquisitions or investments, incur unanticipated liabilities, and harm our business generally.

Future acquisitions may also require us to issue additional equity securities, spend our cash, or incur debt (and increased interest expense), liabilities and amortization expenses related to intangible assets or write-offs of goodwill, which could adversely affect our results of operations and dilute the economic and voting rights of our stockholders. Also, the anticipated benefit of many of our acquisitions may not materialize.

Risks Related to the Market for our Shares
Our stock price has been volatile historically and may continue to be volatile.
The trading price of our common stock has been and may continue to be subject to wide fluctuations. During the twelve months ended February 6, 2013, the closing price of our common stock on the NASDAQ Global Select Market ranged from $16.74 to $30.85. Our stock price may fluctuate in response to a number of events and factors, such as quarterly variations in operating results; announcements of technological innovations or new products by us or our competitors; changes in financial

19


estimates and recommendations by securities analysts; the operating and stock price performance of other companies that investors may deem comparable to us; and news reports relating to trends in our markets or general economic conditions.
In addition, the stock market in general, and the market prices for Internet-related companies in particular, have experienced volatility that often has been unrelated to the operating performance of such companies. These broad market and industry fluctuations may adversely affect the price of our stock, regardless of our operating performance.
We are controlled by a principal stockholder.
Ralph Bartel, who founded Travelzoo and who is a Director of Travelzoo, is our largest stockholder, holding beneficially, as of December 31, 2012, approximately 50.5% of our outstanding shares. Through his share ownership, he is in a position to control Travelzoo and to elect our entire board of directors.

Risks Related to Legal Uncertainty
We may become subject to shareholder lawsuits over securities violations due to volatile stock price and this can be burdensome to management and costly to defend.
Shareholder lawsuits for securities violations are often launched against companies whose stock price is volatile. Such lawsuits involving the Company would require management’s attention to defend, which may distract attention from operating the Company. In addition, the Company may incur substantial costs to defend itself and/or settle such claims, which may be considered advisable to minimize the distraction and costs of defense. Such lawsuits would result in judgments against the Company requiring substantial payments to claimants. Such costs may materially impact our results of operations and financial condition. Between August 2011 and January 2012, numerous class action and derivative lawsuits were filed against the Company. See further disclosure in Note 3 to the Consolidated Financial Statements included in this report.
We may become subject to burdensome government regulations and legal uncertainties affecting the Internet which could adversely affect our business.
To date, governmental regulations have not materially restricted use of the Internet in our markets. However, the legal and regulatory environment that pertains to the Internet is uncertain and may change. Uncertainty and new regulations could increase our costs of doing business, prevent us from delivering our products and services over the Internet, or slow the growth of the Internet. In addition to new laws and regulations being adopted, existing laws may be applied to the Internet. New and existing laws may cover issues which include:
user privacy;
anti-spam legislation;
consumer protection;
copyright, trademark and patent infringement;
pricing controls;
characteristics and quality of products and services;
sales and other taxes; and
other claims based on the nature and content of Internet materials.
We may be liable as a result of information retrieved from or transmitted over the Internet.
We may be sued for defamation, negligence, copyright or trademark infringement or other legal claims relating to information that is published or made available in our products. These types of claims have been brought, sometimes successfully, against online services in the past. The fact that we distribute information via e-mail may subject us to potential risks, such as liabilities or claims resulting from unsolicited e-mail or spamming, lost or misdirected messages, security breaches, illegal or fraudulent use of e-mail or interruptions or delays in e-mail service. In addition, we could incur significant costs in investigating and defending such claims, even if we ultimately are not liable. If any of these events occur, our business could be materially adversely affected.

20


The implementation of the CARD Act and similar state and foreign laws may harm our Local Deals business.
Vouchers which are issued under our Local Deals and Getaway may be considered gift cards, gift certificates, stored value cards or prepaid cards and therefore governed by, among other laws, the Credit Card Act of 2009 (the "CARD Act"), and state laws governing gift cards, stored value cards and coupons. Other foreign jurisdictions have similar laws in place, in particular European jurisdictions where the European E-Money Directive regulates the business of electronic money institutions. Many of these laws contain provisions governing the use of gift cards, gift certificates, stored value cards or prepaid cards, including specific disclosure requirements and prohibitions or limitations on the use of expiration dates and the imposition of certain fees. For example, if the vouchers are subject to the CARD Act and are not included in the exemption for promotional programs, it is possible that the purchase value, which is the amount equal to the price paid for the voucher, or the promotional value, which is the add-on value of the voucher in excess of the price paid, or both, may not expire before the later of (i) five years after the date on which the voucher was issued; (ii) the voucher’s stated expiration date (if any); or (iii) a later date provided by applicable state law. Purported class actions against other companies have been filed in federal and state court claiming that coupons similar to the vouchers are subject to the CARD Act and various state laws governing gift cards and that the defendants have violated these laws by issuing the coupons with expiration dates and other restrictions. In addition, investigations by certain state attorney general offices have been launched against other companies with regards to similar issues. If similar claims are asserted against the Company in respect of the Local Deals and Getaway vouchers and are successful, we may become subject to fines and penalties and incur additional costs. In addition, if federal or state laws require that the face value of our vouchers have a minimum expiration period beyond the period desired by a merchant for its promotional program, or no expiration period, this may affect the willingness of merchants to issue vouchers in jurisdictions where these laws apply. For unredeemed vouchers, similar laws in other jurisdictions require us or merchants to honor the face value of vouchers sold, after the redemption period. For example, in Germany, certain consumer protection laws require us to refund consumers for almost four years after the purchase date for the amount of the face value of purchased vouchers which remains unredeemed at the end of the redemption period. Therefore, we do not recognize the unredeemed amounts as revenue until after we are not subject to these laws. There may be similar laws in other countries or provinces that require similar practices. Such developments may materially and adversely affect the profitability or viability of our Local Deals and Getaway.
If we are required to materially increase the estimated liability recorded in our financial statements with respect to unredeemed Local Deals and Getaway vouchers due to application of certain gift card laws, our net income could be materially and adversely affected.
In certain states and foreign jurisdictions, our Local Deals and Getaway vouchers may be considered a gift card. Some of these states and foreign jurisdictions include gift cards under their unclaimed and abandoned property laws which require companies to remit to the government the value of the unredeemed balance on the gift cards after a specified period of time (generally between one and five years) and impose certain reporting and recordkeeping obligations. We do not remit any amounts relating to unredeemed vouchers we sell based on our assessment of applicable laws. The analysis of the potential application of the unclaimed and abandoned property laws to our vouchers is complex, involving an analysis of constitutional and statutory provisions and factual issues, including our relationship with subscribers and merchants and our role as it relates to the issuance and delivery of a voucher. In the event that one or more states or foreign jurisdictions successfully challenges our position on the application of its unclaimed and abandoned property laws to vouchers, or if the estimates that we use in projecting the likelihood of vouchers being redeemed prove to be inaccurate, our liabilities with respect to unredeemed vouchers may be materially higher than the amounts shown in our financial statements. If we are required to materially increase the estimated liability recorded in our financial statements with respect to unredeemed gift cards, our net income could be materially and adversely affected. Moreover, a successful challenge to our position could subject us to penalties or interest on unreported and unremitted sums, and any such penalties or interest would have a further material adverse impact on our net income.
New tax treatment of companies engaged in Internet commerce may adversely affect the commercial use of our services and our financial results.
Due to the global nature of the Internet, it is possible that various states or foreign countries might attempt to regulate our transmissions or levy sales, income or other taxes relating to our activities. Tax authorities at the international, federal, state and local levels are currently reviewing the appropriate treatment of companies engaged in Internet commerce. New or revised international, federal, state or local tax regulations may subject us or our subscribers to additional sales, income and other taxes. We cannot predict the effect of current attempts to impose sales, income or other taxes on commerce over the Internet. New or revised taxes and, in particular, sales taxes, VAT and similar taxes would likely increase the cost of doing business online and decrease the attractiveness of advertising and selling goods and services over the Internet. New taxes could also create significant increases in internal costs necessary to capture data, and collect and remit taxes. Any of these events could have an adverse effect on our business and results of operations.

21


We may suffer liability as a result of information retrieved from or transmitted over the Internet and claims related to our service offerings.
We may be sued for defamation, civil rights infringement, negligence, patent, copyright or trademark infringement, invasion of privacy, personal injury, product liability, breach of contract, unfair competition, discrimination, antitrust or other legal claims relating to information that is published or made available on our websites or service offerings we make available (including provision of an application programming interface platform for third parties to access our website, mobile device services and geolocation applications). This risk is enhanced in certain jurisdictions outside the United States, where our liability for such third-party actions may be less clear and we may be less protected. In addition, we could incur significant costs in investigating and defending such claims, even if we ultimately are not found liable. If any of these events occurs, our net income could be materially and adversely affected.
We are subject to risks associated with information disseminated through our websites and applications, including consumer data, content that is produced by our editorial staff and errors or omissions related to our product offerings. Such information, whether accurate or inaccurate, may result in our being sued by our advertisers, merchants, subscribers or third parties and as a result our revenue and goodwill could be materially and adversely affected.
Claims have been asserted against us relating to shares not issued in our 2002 merger.
The merger of Travelzoo.com Corporation into the Company became effective on April 25, 2002. Holders of promotional shares of Travelzoo.com Corporation who established they had satisfied certain prerequisite qualifications were allowed a period of two years following the effective date to receive one share of Travelzoo Inc. in exchange for each share of common stock of Travelzoo.com Corporation. After April 25, 2004, two years following the effective date, we ceased issuing shares to the former stockholders of Travelzoo.com Corporation. Many of the “Netsurfer stockholders,” who had applied to receive shares of Travelzoo.com Corporation in 1998 for no cash consideration, did not elect to receive their shares which were issuable in the merger prior to the end of the two-year period. A total of 4,115,532 of our shares which had been reserved for issuance in the merger were not claimed.
As discussed under Note 1 to the accompanying consolidated financial statements, on April 21, 2011, we settled all claims by the State of Delaware relating to a previously-announced unclaimed property review relating to shares of Travelzoo which have not been claimed by former Netsurfers stockholders of Travelzoo.com Corporation as discussed in the preceding paragraph. Unclaimed shares which were properly issuable would have been subject to escheat to the State of Delaware because the Company is organized under Delaware law. Under applicable law, unclaimed property held by a corporation is subject to escheat to the jurisdiction of incorporation if the address of the owner is unknown.
Since March 2012, the Company has become subject to unclaimed property reviews by most of the other states in the U.S. that relate primarily to the unexchanged promotional merger shares, which were not covered by the settlement and release by the State of Delaware. During the three months ended March 31, 2012, the Company recorded a $3.0 million charge related to this unexchanged promotional merger shares contingency. While the company believes it has meritorious defenses regarding the applicability of escheat rights related to this unexchanged promotional merger shares contingency, the ultimate resolution of this matter may take longer than one year. If the claims for all of the additional shares referred to in the preliminary findings were upheld in full, based on the closing price of the Company’s shares at the end of December 2012, the cost to the Company would be approximately $18.1 million in excess of the amount accrued, plus any interest and penalties which might be applicable. In addition, the total amount of exposure of this contingency is dependent upon the manner in which each state applies its unclaimed property laws. The Company is not able to predict the ultimate amount or outcome of any current or future claims which have been or might be asserted relating to the unissued shares.
The Company is continuing its program under which it makes cash payments to people who establish that they satisfy the conditions to receive shares of Travelzoo.com Corporation, and who failed to submit requests to convert their shares into shares of Travelzoo Inc. within the required time period. The accompanying consolidated financial statements include a charge in general and administrative expenses of $33,000 for the year ended December 31, 2012. The total cost of this program is not reliably estimable because it is based on the ultimate number of valid requests received and future levels of the Company’s common stock price, and would be affected by any settlement of the pending reviews referred to above. The Company’s common stock price affects the liability because the amount of cash payments under the program is based in part on the recent level of the stock price at the date valid requests are received. As noted above, in order to receive payment under the program, a person is required to establish that such person validly held shares in Travelzoo.com Corporation.
Federal laws and regulations, such as the Bank Secrecy Act and the USA PATRIOT Act and similar foreign laws, could be expanded to include Local Deals and Getaway vouchers.

22


Various federal laws, such as the Bank Secrecy Act and the USA PATRIOT Act and foreign laws and regulations, such as the European Directive on the prevention of the use of the financial system for the purpose of money laundering and terrorist financing, impose certain anti-money laundering requirements on companies that are financial institutions or that provide financial products and services. For these purposes, financial institutions are broadly defined to include money services businesses such as money transmitters, check cashers and providers of prepaid access cards. Examples of anti-money laundering requirements imposed on financial institutions include customer identification and verification programs, suspicious activity monitoring and reporting, record retention policies and procedures and transaction reporting. We do not believe that we are a financial institution subject to these laws and regulations based, in part, upon the closed loop nature and other characteristics of vouchers and our role with respect to the distribution of vouchers to subscribers. However, the Financial Crimes Enforcement Network, a division of the U.S. Department of the Treasury tasked with implementing the requirements of the Bank Secrecy Act, recently issued final rules regarding the scope and requirements for non-bank parties involved in stored value or prepaid access cards, including obligations on sellers or providers of “prepaid access”. Under the final rule, providers or sellers of closed loop vouchers, such as those offered through the Local Deals program, would only be subject to registration if the voucher exceed $2,000 in total value or if they are sold in aggregate amounts exceeding $10,000 to any single person in one day. Should the $2,000 limit be exceeded or should more than $10,000 in aggregate vouchers be sold to any individual person (sales to businesses for resale or distribution are excluded) then we may be deemed either a seller or provider of prepaid access subject to regulation. In the event that we become subject to the requirements of the Bank Secrecy Act or any other anti-money laundering law or regulation imposing obligations on us as a money services business, our regulatory compliance costs to meet these obligations would likely increase which could reduce our net income. In addition, the costs for third parties to sell vouchers would increase, which may restrict our ability to enlist third parties to issue vouchers.
Our internal control over financial reporting may not be effective, and our independent auditors may not be able to certify as to the effectiveness of such internal controls, which could have a significant and adverse effect on our business.
We are obligated to evaluate our internal control over financial reporting in order to allow management to report on, and our independent auditors to opine on, our internal control over financial reporting, as required by Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 and the rules and regulations of the SEC, which we collectively refer to as Section 404. In our Section 404 evaluation, we have identified areas of internal controls that may need improvement and have instituted remediation efforts where necessary. Currently, none of our identified areas that need improvement has been categorized as material weaknesses. We may identify conditions that may result in significant deficiencies or material weaknesses in the future.
We may be unable to protect our registered trademark or other proprietary intellectual property rights.
Our success depends to a significant degree upon the protection of the Travelzoo brand name. We rely upon a combination of copyright, trade secret and trademark laws, as well as non-disclosure and other contractual arrangements to protect our intellectual property rights. The steps we have taken to protect our proprietary rights, however, may not always succeed in deterring misappropriation of proprietary information.
We have registered the Travelzoo trademark in the U.S., Australia, Canada, China, Hong Kong, Japan, South Korea, Taiwan, the EU and the U.K. If we are unable to protect our rights in the mark in North America, Europe, and Asia Pacific, where we have licensed the trademark as described above under “overview”, a key element of our strategy of promoting Travelzoo as a brand could be disrupted and our business could be adversely affected. We may not always be able to detect unauthorized use of our proprietary information or take appropriate steps to enforce our intellectual property rights. In addition, the validity, enforceability, and scope of protection of intellectual property in Internet-related industries are uncertain and still evolving. The laws of countries in which we may market our services in the future are uncertain and may afford little or no effective protection of our intellectual property. The unauthorized reproduction or other misappropriation of our proprietary technology could enable third parties to benefit from our technology and brand name without paying us for them. If this were to occur, our business could be materially adversely affected.
We may face liability from intellectual property litigation that could be costly to prosecute or defend and distract management’s attention with no assurance of success.
We cannot be certain that our products, content and brand names do not or will not infringe valid patents, copyrights or other intellectual property rights held by third parties. While we have a trademark for “Travelzoo,” many companies in the industry have similar names including the word “travel”. We expect that infringement claims in our markets will increase in number as more participants enter the markets. We may be subject to legal proceedings and claims from time to time relating to the intellectual property of others in the ordinary course of our business. We may incur substantial expenses in defending against these third party infringement claims, regardless of their merit, and such claims could result in a significant diversion of the efforts of our management personnel. Successful infringement claims against us may result in monetary liability or a material disruption in the conduct of our business. As discussed under Note 3 to the consolidated financial statements included

23


in this report, a lawsuit was recently filed against us by a non-practicing entity, commonly referred to as a "patent troll", claiming that the trip-planning Metasearch service available on Fly.com infringes one or more claims of certain asserted patents. The plaintiff has asserted similar claims against other Metasearch websites, including Expedia, Orbitz, Travelocity, Priceline, Yahoo! Inc., American Express, KAYAK and BookIt.

Item 1B. Unresolved Staff Comments
None.

Item 2. Properties
We are headquartered in New York, New York, where we occupy approximately 10,600 square feet of leased office space. In addition to our New York office, we have several leased offices throughout the U.S. and Canada for our North America operations, including offices in Chicago, Illinois, Austin, Texas, Dallas, Texas, Las Vegas, Nevada, Los Angeles, California, Miami, Florida, Mountain View, California, San Francisco, California, Toronto, Ontario and Vancouver, British Columbia.
We also have leased offices for our Europe operations in France, Germany, Spain, and the U.K., including offices in Barcelona, Hamburg, London, Manchester, Munich, and Paris.
We believe that our leased facilities are adequate to meet our current needs; however, we intend to expand our operations and therefore may require additional facilities in the future. We believe that such additional facilities are available.
Item 3. Legal Proceedings
The information set forth under “Note 3 - Commitments and Contingencies” to the consolidated financial statements included in Part II, Item 8 of this report is incorporated herein by reference.
Item 4. (Removed and Reserved)
PART II
Item 5. Market for Registrant's Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities
Market Information
Since August 18, 2004, our common stock has been trading on the NASDAQ Global Select Market under the symbol “TZOO.” From December 30, 2003 to August 17, 2004, our common stock was traded on the NASDAQ SmallCap Market under the symbol “TZOO.” The following table sets forth, for the periods indicated, the high and low sales prices per share of our common stock as reported by NASDAQ.
 
High 
 
Low 
 
2012:
 
 
Fourth Quarter
$23.95
$16.74
Third Quarter
$24.25
$19.55
Second Quarter
$27.46
$21.06
First Quarter
$30.85
$23.00
2011:
 
 
Fourth Quarter
$33.28
$21.02
Third Quarter
$87.79
$21.99
Second Quarter
$101.00
$55.64
First Quarter
$68.48
$37.70
On February 6, 2013, the last reported sales price of our common stock on the NASDAQ Global Select Market was $21.17 per share.
As of February 6, 2013, there were approximately 85,000 stockholders of record of our shares.

24


Dividend Policy
Travelzoo has not declared or paid any cash dividends since inception and does not expect to pay cash dividends for the foreseeable future. The payment of dividends will be at the discretion of our board of directors and will depend upon factors such as future earnings, capital requirements, our financial condition and general business conditions.
Sales of Unregistered Securities
There were no unregistered sales of equity securities during fiscal year 2012.
Repurchases of Equity Securities
Stock repurchase activity during the three months ended December 31, 2012 was as follows:  
Period
Total Number of
Shares
Purchased
Average Price
Paid
per Share
Total Number of
Shares
Purchased
as Part of
Publicly
Announced
Programs
Maximum Shares
that May Yet
be Purchased Under
the Programs (1)
October 1, 2012 - October 31, 2012



839,000

November 1, 2012 - November 30, 2012
231,000

$
17.34

231,000

608,000

December 1, 2012 - December 31, 2012
208,000

$
18.73

208,000

400,000

 
 
 
 
 
 
439,000

 
439,000

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
(1)
In July 2012, our Board authorized a stock repurchase program that provided for the repurchase of up to 1,000,000 shares of our common stock. As of December 31, 2012, 600,000 shares were repurchased and therefore there were 400,000 shares remaining to be repurchased under this program.


25


Performance Graph

The following graph compares, for the dates specified, the cumulative total stockholder return for Travelzoo, the NASDAQ Stock Market (U.S. companies) Index (the “NASDAQ Market Index”), and the Standard & Poor's 500 Publishing Index (the “S&P 500 Publishing”). Measurement points are the last trading day of each of the Company's fiscal years ended December 31, 2007, December 31, 2008, December 31, 2009, December 31, 2010, December 31, 2011, and December 31, 2012. The graph assumes that $100 was invested on December 31, 2007 in the Common Stock of the Company, the NASDAQ Market Index and the S&P 500 Publishing and assumes reinvestment of any dividends. The stock price performance on the following graph is not indicative of future stock price performance.
 
 
Measurement Point
 
12/31/2007 
 

12/31/2008 
 

12/31/2009 
 

12/31/2010 
 

12/31/2011 
 

12/31/2012 
 

Travelzoo Inc.
$
100

$
40.64

$
89.84

$
302.49

$
179.68

$
138.82

NASDAQ Market Index
$
100

$
59.46

$
85.55

$
100.02

$
98.22

$
113.85

S&P 500 Publishing
$
100

$
37.18

$
56.61

$
60.46

$
67.24

$
84.35



26



Item 6. Selected Consolidated Financial Data
The selected consolidated financial data set forth below are derived from our audited consolidated financial statements. The following selected consolidated financial data is qualified in its entirety by, and should be read in conjunction with, “Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” and the consolidated financial statements and the notes thereto included elsewhere herein.
Consolidated Statement of Operations Data:
 
 
Year Ended December 31,
 
2012
 
2011
 
2010
 
2009
 
2008
 
(In thousands, except per share data)
Revenues
$
151,168

 
$
148,342

 
$
112,784

 
$
93,973

 
$
80,817

Income from continuing operations
25,489

 
15,022

 
23,512

 
13,708

 
13,312

Income from continuing operations, net of taxes
18,198

 
3,319

 
13,157

 
6,418

 
5,913

Loss from discontinued operations, net of taxes

 

 

 
(1,233
)
 
(10,029
)
Net income (loss)
18,198

 
3,319

 
13,157

 
5,185

 
(4,116
)
Basic net income (loss) per share from:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Continuing operations
$
1.15

 
$
0.20

 
$
0.80

 
$
0.39

 
$
0.41

Discontinued operations
$

 
$

 
$

 
$
(0.08
)
 
$
(0.70
)
Net income (loss) per share
$
1.15

 
$
0.20

 
$
0.80

 
$
0.32

 
$
(0.29
)
Diluted net income (loss) per share from:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Continuing operations
$
1.14

 
$
0.20

 
$
0.80

 
$
0.39

 
$
0.37

Discontinued operations
$

 
$

 
$

 
$
(0.08
)
 
$
(0.62
)
Net income (loss) per share
$
1.14

 
$
0.20

 
$
0.80

 
$
0.32

 
$
(0.25
)
Shares used in per share calculation — basic
15,866

 
16,315

 
16,444

 
16,408

 
14,273

Shares used in per share calculation — diluted
15,901

 
16,414

 
16,453

 
16,416

 
16,190

Consolidated Balance Sheet Data:
 
 
Year Ended December 31,
 
2012
 
2011
 
2010
 
2009
 
2008
 
(In thousands, except per share data)
Cash and cash equivalents
$
61,169

 
$
38,744

 
$
41,184

 
$
19,776

 
$
14,179

Working capital
$
42,654

 
$
28,411

 
$
39,563

 
$
27,250

 
$
17,642

Total assets
$
97,833

 
$
68,348

 
$
66,002

 
$
46,132

 
$
35,322

Stockholders' equity
$
43,339

 
$
34,759

 
$
45,889

 
$
30,771

 
$
20,763



Item 7. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations
The information in this report contains forward-looking statements within the meaning of Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, and Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended. Such statements are based upon current expectations, assumptions, estimates and projections about Travelzoo and our industry. These forward-looking statements are subject to the many risks and uncertainties that exist in our operations and business environment that may cause actual results, performance or achievements of Travelzoo to be different from those expected or anticipated in the forward-looking statements. Any statements contained herein that are not statements of historical fact may be deemed to be forward-looking statements. For example, words such as “may”, “will”, “should”, “estimates”, “predicts”, “potential”, “continue”, “strategy”, “believes”, “anticipates”, “plans”, “expects”, “intends”, and similar expressions are intended to identify forward-looking statements. Travelzoo’s actual results and the timing of certain events could differ significantly from those anticipated in such forward-looking statements. Factors that might cause or contribute to such a discrepancy include, but are not limited to, those discussed elsewhere in this report in the section entitled “Risk Factors” and the risks discussed in our other SEC filings. The forward-looking statements included in this report reflect the beliefs of our management on the date of this report. Travelzoo undertakes no obligation to update publicly any forward-looking statements for any reason, even if new information becomes available or other circumstances occur in the future.

Overview

27


Travelzoo Inc. (the “Company”, or “Travelzoo”) is a global Internet media company. We inform over 26 million subscribers in North America, Europe and Asia Pacific, as well as millions of website users, about the best travel and entertainment deals available from thousands of companies. Our deal experts source, research and test-book offers, recommending only those that meet Travelzoo’s rigorous quality standards. We provide travel, entertainment and local businesses with a fast, flexible, and cost-effective way to reach millions of consumers. Our revenues are generated primarily from advertising fees. In Asia Pacific, the Travelzoo business is operated by Travelzoo (Asia) Limited and Travelzoo Japan K.K. under a License agreement with Travelzoo Inc.
Our publications and products include the Travelzoo websites (www.travelzoo.com, www.travelzoo.ca, www.travelzoo.co.uk, www.travelzoo.de, www.travelzoo.es, www.travelzoo.fr, among others), the Travelzoo Top 20 e-mail newsletter, and the Newsflash e-mail alert service. We operate SuperSearch, a pay-per-click travel search tool, and the Travelzoo Network, a network of third-party websites that list deals published by Travelzoo. We also operate Fly.com, a travel search engine that allows users to quickly and easily find the best prices on flights from hundreds of airlines and online travel agencies. In addition, we operate Local Deals and Getaway services, which allow our subscribers to purchase vouchers for deals from local businesses such as spas, hotels and restaurants through the Travelzoo website. Vouchers are redeemable at the local businesses during the promotional period. We receive a percentage of the face value of the voucher from the local businesses.
In 2009, we sold of our Asia Pacific operating segment, including our wholly-owned subsidiaries, Travelzoo (Asia) Limited and Travelzoo Japan K.K., to Azzurro Capital Inc. We have not had significant ongoing involvement with the operations of the Asia Pacific operating segment and have not had material economic interests in the Asia Pacific operating segment since the completion of the sale. Starting November 1, 2009, the Travelzoo websites in Asia Pacific (cn.travelzoo.com, www.travelzoo.co.jp, www.travelzoo.com.au, www.travelzoo.com.hk, www.travelzoo.com.tw, among others), the Travelzoo Top 20 e-mail newsletters in Asia Pacific and the Newsflash e-mail alert service in Asia Pacific have been published by Travelzoo (Asia) Limited and Travelzoo Japan K.K., under a license agreement with the Company. There is a reciprocal revenue-sharing agreement among the entities operating the Travelzoo business in Asia Pacific and the Company related to cross-selling audiences, channels and offers.
More than 2,000 companies use our services, including Air New Zealand, Apple Vacation, British Airways, Harrah’s Entertainment, Expedia, Fairmont Hotels and Resorts, Hilton Hotels, Interstate Hotels & Resorts, JetBlue Airways, Key Tours International, Liberty Travel, Marriott Hotels, Royal Caribbean, Spirit Airlines, Starwood Hotels & Resorts Worldwide, Travelocity, United Airlines, and Virgin Atlantic.

We have two operating segments based on geographic regions: North America and Europe. North America consists of our operations in Canada and the U.S. Europe consists of our operations in France, Germany, Spain, and the U.K. For the year ended December 31, 2012, European operations were 28% of revenues. Financial information with respect to our business segments and certain financial information about geographic areas appears in Note 8 to the accompanying consolidated financial statements.
When evaluating the financial condition and operating performance of the Company, management focuses on financial and non-financial indicators such as growth in the number of subscribers to the Company’s newsletters and page views of the homepages of the Travelzoo websites, operating margin, growth in revenues in the absolute and relative to the growth in reach of the Company’s publications measured as revenue per subscriber and revenue per employee as a measure of productivity.

How We Generate Revenue
Our revenues are advertising revenues, consisting primarily of listing fees paid by travel, entertainment and local businesses to advertise their offers on Travelzoo’s media properties. Listing fees are based on audience reach, placement, number of listings, number of impressions, number of clicks, number of referrals, or percentage of the face value of vouchers sold. Insertion orders are typically for periods between one month and twelve months and are not automatically renewed. Merchant agreements for Local Deals and Getaway advertisers are typically for twelve months and are not automatically renewed. We have three separate groups of our advertising products: Travel, Search and Local.
Our Travel category of revenue includes the publishing revenue for negotiated high-quality deals from travel companies, such as hotels, airlines, cruises or car rentals and includes products such as Top 20, Website, Newsflash, Travelzoo Network as well as Getaway vouchers. The revenues generated from these products are based upon a fee for number of e-mails delivered to our audience, a fee for clicks delivered to the advertisers, a fee for placement of the advertising on our website or a fee based on a percentage of the face value of vouchers sold or other items sold. We recognize revenue upon delivery of the e-mails, delivery of the clicks, over the period of placement of the advertising and upon the sale of the vouchers or other items sold.

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Our Search category of revenue includes comparison shopping tools for consumers to quickly and easily compare airfares, hotel and car rental prices and includes SuperSearch and Fly.com products. The revenues generated from these products are based upon a fee for clicks delivered to the advertisers or a fee for clicks delivered to advertisers that resulted in revenue for advertisers (i.e. successful clicks). We recognize revenue upon delivery of the clicks or successful clicks.
Our Local category of revenue includes the publishing revenue for negotiated high-quality deals from local businesses, such as restaurants, spas, shows, and other activities and includes Local Deals vouchers and entertainment offers (vouchers and direct bookings). The revenues generated from these products are based upon a percentage of the face value of vouchers or items sold or a fee for clicks delivered to the advertisers. We recognize revenue upon the sale of the vouchers, when we receive notification of the direct bookings or upon delivery of the clicks. The Company earns a fee for acting as an agent in these transactions, which is recorded on a net basis and is included in revenue upon completion of the voucher sale. Certain merchant contracts in foreign locations allow us to retain fees related to vouchers sold that are not redeemed by purchasers upon expiration, which we recognize as revenue after the expiration of the redemption period and after there are no further obligations to provide funds to merchants, subscribers or others.
Trends in Our Business
Our ability to generate revenues in the future depends on numerous factors such as our ability to sell more advertising to existing and new advertisers, our ability to increase our audience reach and advertising rates and our ability to develop and launch new products.
Our current revenue model depends on advertising fees paid primarily by travel, entertainment and local businesses. A number of factors can influence whether current and new advertisers decide to advertise their offers with us. We have been impacted and expect to continue to be impacted by external factors such as the shift from offline to online advertising, the relative health of the economy, competition and the introduction of new methods of advertising. For example, the consolidation of the airline industry reduced our revenues generated from this sector; the reduction of capacity in the airline industry reduced demand to advertise for excess capacity; the introduction of new voucher-based products offered by competitive companies impacted our ability to sell our existing advertising products; the reduction in spending by travel intermediaries due to their focus on improving profitability, the trend towards mobile usage by consumers, the willingness of consumers to purchase the deals we advertise, the willingness of certain competitors to grow their business unprofitably and the economic uncertainty in Europe impacted advertiser’s willingness to purchase our advertising. In addition, we have been impacted and expect to continue to be impacted by internal factors such as introduction of new advertising products, hiring and relying on key employees for the continued maintenance and growth of our business and ensuring our advertising products continue to attract the audience that advertisers desire.

Existing advertisers may shift from one advertising service (e.g. Top 20) to another (e.g. Local Deals and Getaway). These shifts between advertising services by advertisers could result in no incremental revenue or less revenue than in previous periods depending on the amount purchased by the advertisers, and in particular, with Local Deals and Getaway, depending on how many vouchers are purchased by subscribers. Since the introduction of Local Deals in 2010 and Getaway in 2011, we have seen a decline in the number of average vouchers sold per deal.
Our ability to continue to generate advertising revenue depends heavily upon our ability to maintain and grow an attractive audience to reach with our advertising publications. We monitor our subscribers and page views of our websites to assess our efforts to maintain and grow our audience reach. We obtain additional subscribers and activity on our websites by acquiring traffic from Internet search companies. The costs to grow our audience have had, and we expect will continue to have, a significant impact on our financial results and can vary from period to period. We may have to increase our expenditures on acquiring traffic to continue to grow or maintain our reach of our publications due to competition.
We believe that we can increase our advertising rates only if the reach of our publications increases. We do not know if we will be able to increase the reach of our publications. If we are able to increase the reach of our publications, we still may not be able to or want to increase rates given market conditions such as intense competition in our industry. We have not had any significant rate increase in recent years due to intense competition in our industry. Even if we increase our rates, based upon the increased price this may reduce the amount of advertisers willing to advertise for the increased rates and therefore decrease our revenue.
We do not know what our cost of revenues as a percentage of revenues will be in future periods. Our cost of revenues will increase if the number of searches performed on Fly.com increases because we pay a fee based on the number of searches performed on Fly.com. Our cost of revenues will increase if the face value of vouchers that we sell for Local Deals and Getaway increases or the total number of vouchers sold increases because we have credit card fees based upon face value of vouchers sold, customer service costs related to vouchers sold and subscriber refunds on vouchers sold. We expect fluctuations

29


of cost of revenues as a percentage of revenues from quarter to quarter. Some of the fluctuations may be significant and have a material impact on our results of operations.
We do not know what our sales and marketing expenses as a percentage of revenue will be in future periods. Increased competition in our industry may require us to increase advertising for our brand and for our products. In order to increase the reach of our publications, we have to acquire a significant number of new subscribers in every quarter and continue to promote our brand. One significant factor that impacts our advertising expenses is the average cost per acquisition of a new subscriber. Increases in the average cost of acquiring new subscribers may result in an increase of sales and marketing expenses as a percentage of revenue. We believe that the average cost per acquisition depends mainly on the advertising rates which we pay for media buys, our ability to manage our subscriber acquisition efforts successfully, and the degree of competition in our industry. We may decide to accelerate our subscriber acquisition for various strategic and tactical reasons and, as a result, increase our marketing expenses. We may see a unique opportunity for a brand marketing campaign that will result in an increase of marketing expenses. Further, we expect our strategy to replicate our business model in selected foreign markets to result in a significant increase in our sales and marketing expenses and have a material adverse impact on our results of operations. Due to the continued desire to grow our business both in the North America and Europe we expect relatively high level of sales and marketing expenses in the foreseeable future. We expect fluctuations of sales and marketing expenses as a percentage of revenue from year to year and from quarter to quarter. Some of the fluctuations may be significant and have a material impact on our results of operations. We expect increased marketing expense to spur continued growth in subscribers and revenue in future periods; however, we cannot be assured of this due to the many factors that impact our growth in subscribers and revenue. We expect to adjust the level of such incremental spending during any given quarter based upon market conditions as well as our performance in each quarter.
We do not know what our general and administrative expenses as a percentage of revenue will be in future periods. There may be fluctuations that have a material impact on our results of operations. We expect our headcount to continue to increase in the future. The Company’s headcount is one of the main drivers of general and administrative expenses. Therefore, we expect our absolute general and administrative expenses to continue to increase. We expect our continued expansion into foreign markets and development of new advertising formats to result in a significant additional increase in our general and administrative expenses. Our general and administrative expenses as a percentage of revenue may also fluctuate depending on the number of requests received related to a program under which the Company intends to make cash payments to people who establish that they were former stockholders of Travelzoo.com Corporation, and who failed to submit requests to convert shares into Travelzoo Inc. within the required time period. We expect an increase in legal and professional fees due primarily to our defense of legal proceedings and claims and compliance efforts. In addition, we expect to incur additional costs related to the development of our hotel booking platform capabilities.
We do not know what our income taxes will be in future periods. There may be fluctuations that have a material impact on our results of operations. Our income taxes are dependent on numerous factors such as the geographic mix of our taxable income, federal and state and foreign country tax law and regulations and changes thereto, the amount of accumulated net operating loss we have to offset current taxable income, the determination of whether valuation allowances for certain tax assets are required or not, including our valuation allowance on our European loss carryforwards, audits of prior years' tax returns resulting in adjustments, resolution of uncertain tax positions and different treatment for certain items for tax versus books such as the disposition of our Asia business in 2009 or our State of Delaware settlement during 2011. We expect fluctuations in our income taxes from year to year and from quarter to quarter. Some of the fluctuations may be significant and have a material impact on our results of operations.
The key elements of our growth strategy include building strong brand awareness, increasing reach, maintaining a high-quality user base, increasing the number of advertisers, providing advertisers with excellent service and replicating our business model in foreign markets, as well as developing new products that keep pace with changes in consumer preferences and technology, such as the trend toward mobile usage by consumers. We expect to continue our efforts to grow; however, we may not grow or we may experience slower growth. Some examples of our efforts to expand our business internationally since our inception from the U.S. have been expansion to the U.K. in 2005, Canada in 2006, Germany in 2006, France in 2007 and Spain in 2008. We also have launched new products to grow our revenue such as the introduction of Fly.com in 2009, Local Deals in 2010, Getaway in 2011 as well as our mobile application launches in 2011 and 2012. We bought an online hotel booking platform to serve hotels and to facilitate a hotel commission-based offering.
We believe that we can sell more advertising only if the market for online advertising continues to grow and if we can maintain or increase our market share. We believe that the market for advertising continues to shift from offline to online. We do not know if we will be able to maintain or increase our market share. We do not know if we will be able to increase the number of advertisers in the future. We do not know if we will have market acceptance of our new products or whether the market will continue to accept our existing products.


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Results of Operations
The following table sets forth, as a percentage of total revenues, the results from our operations for the periods indicated.
 
 
Year Ended December 31,
 
2012
 
2011
 
2010
 
Revenues
100.0
%
 
100.0
%
 
100.0
%
 
Cost of revenues
10.4

 
9.0

 
6.4

 
Gross profit
89.6

 
91.0

 
93.6

 
Operating expenses:
 
 
 
 
 
 
Sales and marketing
45.1

 
44.1

 
48.3

 
General and administrative
25.6

 
23.3

 
24.4

 
Unexchanged promotional merger shares
2.0

 
13.5

 

 
Total operating expenses
72.7

 
80.9

 
72.7

 
Income from operations
16.9

 
10.1

 
20.9

 
Other income and expenses, net
0.2

 
0.2

 
(0.1
)
 
Income before income taxes
17.1

 
10.3

 
20.8

 
Income taxes
5.0

 
8.1

 
9.2

 
Net income
12.1
%
 
2.2
%
 
11.6
%
 

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Operating Metrics
The following table sets forth operating metrics in North America and Europe for the years ended December 31, 2012, 2011 and 2010:
 
 
Years Ended December 31,
 
2012
 
2011
 
2010
North America
 
 
 
 
 
Total Subscribers
16,087,000

 
15,660,000

 
14,274,000

Average cost per acquisition of a new subscriber
$
1.23

 
$
1.15

 
$
1.62

Revenue per employee (2)
$
445

 
$
510

 
$
636

Revenue per subscriber (3)
$
6.95

 
$
7.61

 
$
6.62

Europe
 
 
 
 
 
Total Subscribers
6,371,000

 
5,806,000

 
4,614,000

Average cost per acquisition of a new subscriber
$
2.54

 
$
2.86

 
$
3.55

Revenue per employee (2)
$
291

 
$
322

 
$
291

Revenue per subscriber (3)
$
7.30

 
$
8.62

 
$
6.98

Consolidated
 
 
 
 
 
Total Subscribers (1)
22,458,000

 
21,466,000

 
18,888,000

Average cost per acquisition of a new subscriber
$
1.70

 
$
1.76

 
$
2.28

Revenue per employee (2)
$
388

 
$
441

 
$
504

Revenue per subscriber (3)
$
7.04

 
$
7.85

 
$
6.69


(1)
In Asia Pacific, the Travelzoo business is operated by Travelzoo (Asia) Limited and Travelzoo Japan K.K. under a license agreement with Travelzoo Inc. and is not owned by the Company. These total subscriber amounts exclude Asia Pacific subscribers of 3,700,000, 3,600,000 and 3,100,000 for the years ended December 31, 2012, 2011 and 2010, respectively.
(2)
Annualized revenue divided by number of employees at the end of the year.
(3)
Annualized revenue divided by number of subscribers at the beginning of the year.

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Revenues
The following table sets forth the breakdown of revenues by type and segment for the years ended December 31, 2012, 2011 and 2010. Travel revenue includes travel publications (Top 20, Website, Newsflash, Travelzoo Network) and Getaway vouchers. Search revenue includes SuperSearch and Fly.com. Local revenue includes Local Deals vouchers and Entertainment.
 
 
Years Ended December 31,
 
(In thousands)
 
2012
 
2011
 
2010
 
North America
 
 
 
 
 
 
Travel
$
56,636

 
$
57,795

 
$
53,693

 
Search
23,101

 
23,980

 
24,914

 
Local
29,050

 
26,774

 
9,054

 
Total North America revenues
$
108,787

 
$
108,549

 
$
87,661

 
Europe
 
 
 
 
 
 
Travel
$
29,844

 
$
27,434

 
$
21,786

 
Search
4,149

 
5,089

 
2,404

 
Local
8,388

 
7,270

 
933

 
Total Europe revenues
$
42,381

 
$
39,793

 
$
25,123

 
Consolidated
 
 
 
 
 
 
Travel
$
86,480

 
$
85,229

 
$
75,479

 
Search
27,250

 
29,069

 
27,318

 
Local
37,438

 
34,044

 
9,987

 
Total revenues
$
151,168

 
$
148,342

 
$
112,784

 

North America
North America revenues increased $238,000 in 2012 compared to 2011. This increase was primarily due to an increase in Local revenues, offset by a decrease in Search and Travel revenues. The increase in Local revenue of $2.3 million was primarily due to the increased number of Local Deals vouchers sold. The decrease in Travel revenue of $1.2 million was primarily due to lower Top 20 and Newsflash revenue related to certain online booking engines, hotels and airlines, offset by an increase from Getaway due to increased number of Getaway vouchers sold. The decrease in Search revenue of $879,000 was primarily due to the reduced number of clicks that generate revenue as a result from our reduced spending on traffic acquisition.
North America revenues increased $20.9 million in 2011 compared to 2010. This increase was primarily due to growth of Travel and Local revenues offset by a decrease in Search revenue. The increase in Travel revenue of $4.1 million was primarily due to the introduction of Getaway offset by lower Top 20 and Newsflash revenue related to airline consolidation and increased competition. The decrease in Search revenue of $934,000 was primarily due to the reduced number of clicks that generate revenue as a result from our reduced spending on traffic acquisition as well as lower average cost-per-click paid by our advertisers. The increase in Local revenue of $17.7 million was primarily due to the increased number of Local Deals sold.
Europe
Europe revenues increased $2.6 million in 2012 compared to 2011. This increase was primarily due to growth of Travel and Local revenues offset by a decrease in Search revenue. The increase in Travel revenue of $2.4 million was primarily due to an increase from Getaway due to increased number of Getaway vouchers sold. The increase in Local revenue of $1.1 million was primarily due to the increased number of Local Deals sold. The decrease in Search revenue of $940,000 was primarily due to the decreased number of clicks that generate revenue as a result from decreased spending on traffic acquisition.

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Europe revenues increased $14.7 million in 2011 compared to 2010. This increase was due to growth of Travel, Search and Local revenues. The increase in Travel revenue of $5.6 million was primarily due to the introduction of Getaway, increase in Top 20 and Newsflash revenue from the increased number of emails delivered to our audience driven by advertiser demand and relatively stable average cost-per-email offset by some decrease due to increased competition and the economic uncertainty in Europe. The increase in Search revenue of $2.7 million was primarily due to the increased number of clicks that generate revenue as a result of increased spending on traffic acquisition as well as higher average cost-per-click paid by our advertisers. The increase in Local revenue of $6.3 million was primarily due to the launch of our Local Deals in late 2010.
For the years ended December 31, 2012, 2011 and 2010, none of our customers accounted for 10% or more of our revenue.
Foreign currency movements relative to the U.S. dollar negatively impacted our revenues from our operations in Europe by approximately $1.4 million, $1.7 million and $703,000 for years ended December 31, 2012, 2011 and 2010, respectively.

Cost of Revenues
Cost of revenues consists primarily of network expenses, including fees we pay for co-location services and depreciation and maintenance of network equipment, payments made to third-party partners of the Travelzoo Network, fees we pay related to user searches on Fly.com, amortization of capitalized website development costs, credit card fees, certain estimated subscriber refunds and customer service costs associated with vouchers we sell, and salary expenses associated with network operations and customer service staff. Cost of revenues was $15.7 million, $13.3 million and $7.3 million for the years ended December 31, 2012, 2011 and 2010, respectively.
Cost of revenue increased $2.5 million in 2012 compared to 2011. This increase was primarily due to an increase of $657,000 in payments made to third-party partners of the Travelzoo Network, an increase in Local Deals and Getaway costs including a $643,000 in credit card fees and a $521,000 increase in salary and employee related expenses due primarily to an increase in customer service headcount.
Cost of revenue increased $6.1 million in 2011 compared to 2010. This increase was primarily due to an increase in Local Deals and Getaway costs including $2.0 million in credit card fees, $1.6 million in subscriber refunds and $1.2 million of customer service and professional services costs. In addition, there was an increase of $625,000 in payments made to third-party partners of the Travelzoo Network.

Operating Expenses
Sales and Marketing
Sales and marketing expenses consist primarily of advertising and promotional expenses, salary expenses associated with sales, marketing and production staff, expenses related to our participation in industry conferences, and public relations expenses. Sales and marketing expenses were $68.2 million, $65.5 million and $54.5 million for 2012, 2011 and 2010, respectively. Advertising expenses accounted for 41%, 49% and 58%, respectively, of total sales and marketing expenses and consisted primarily of online advertising which we refer to as traffic acquisition cost and subscriber acquisition costs. The goal of our advertising was to acquire new subscribers for our e-mail products, increase the traffic to our websites, and increase brand awareness.
Sales and marketing expenses increased $2.7 million in 2012 compared to 2011. The increase was primarily due to a $6.3 million increase in salary and employee related expenses due primarily to an increase in headcount, a $1.0 million increase in Search traffic acquisition costs, offset by a $2.0 million dollar decrease in television advertising expense and a $2.6 million decrease in subscriber acquisition costs.
Sales and marketing expenses increased $11.0 million in 2011 compared to 2010. This increase was primarily due to a $10.2 million increase in salary and employee related expenses due in part to an increase in headcount, a $2.0 million dollar increase in television brand advertising expense, a $1.3 million increase in Search traffic acquisition costs, offset by a $2.8 million decrease in subscriber acquisition costs. Despite reduced subscriber acquisition spending, we believe we continued to add new subscribers due to factors such as our website requiring visitors to subscribe to view most deals and the traffic associated with the introduction of Local Deals and Getaway.

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General and Administrative
General and administrative expenses consist primarily of compensation for administrative, executive, and software development staff, fees for professional services, rent, bad debt expense, amortization of intangible assets, and general office expense. General and administrative expenses were $38.7 million, $34.5 million and $27.6 million for 2012, 2011 and 2010, respectively.
General and administrative expenses increased $4.1 million in 2012 compared to 2011. The increase was primarily due to a $2.2 million increase in salary and employee related expenses due primarily to an increase in headcount, and a $1.3 million increase in professional services and other expenses and a $453,000 increase in rent, office and insurance expense due to the continuing expansion of our business.
General and administrative expenses increased $7.0 million in 2011 compared to 2010. The increase was primarily due to a $3.2 million increase in salary and employee related expenses due in part to an increase in headcount, a $2.3 million increase in rent, office and insurance expense due to the continuing expansion of our business, and a $1.1 million increase in professional services expense.
Unexchanged Promotional Merger Shares
On April 21, 2011, the Company entered into an agreement with the State of Delaware resolving all claims relating to a previously-announced unclaimed property review. The primary issue raised in the preliminary findings from the review, received by the Company on April 12, 2011, concerned the shares of Travelzoo which have not been claimed by former shareholders of Travelzoo.com Corporation following a 2002 merger, as previously disclosed in the company’s report on Form 10-K. In the preliminary findings under the unclaimed property review, up to 3.0 million shares were identified as “demandable” under Delaware escheat laws. While the Company continues to take the position that such shares were a promotional incentive and were issuable only to persons who establish their eligibility as shareholders, the Company determined that it was in its best interest to promptly resolve all claims relating to the unclaimed property review. Under the terms of the agreement, the Company made a $20.0 million cash payment to the State of Delaware on April 27, 2011 and received a complete release of those claims. The $20.0 million payment was recorded as an expense in the three months ended March 31, 2011.
Since March 2012, the Company has become subject to unclaimed property reviews by most of the other states in the U.S. that relate primarily to the unexchanged promotional merger shares, which were not covered by the settlement and release by the State of Delaware. During the three months ended March 31, 2012, the Company recorded a $3.0 million charge related to this unexchanged promotional merger shares contingency. While the Company believes it has meritorious defenses regarding the applicability of escheat rights related to this unexchanged promotional merger shares contingency, the ultimate resolution of this matter may take longer than one year. If the claims for all of the additional shares referred to in the preliminary findings were upheld in full, based on the closing price of the Company’s shares at the end of December 31, 2012, the cost to the Company would be approximately $18.1 million in excess of the amount accrued, plus any interest or penalties, which might be applicable. In addition, the total amount of exposure of this contingency is dependent upon the manner in which each state applies its unclaimed property laws. The Company is not able to predict the ultimate amount or outcome of any current or future claims which have been or might be asserted relating to the unissued shares.
See Note 1 to the consolidated financial statements for further information on the unexchanged promotional merger shares contingency.
Interest Income and Other
Interest income and other consisted primarily of interest earned on cash, cash equivalents and restricted cash as well as income from Travelzoo Asia Pacific. Interest income and other was $305,000, $383,000 and $166,000 for 2012, 2011 and 2010, respectively. Interest income and other decreased $78,000 from 2011 to 2012. This decrease was primarily due to lower income related to Travelzoo Asia Pacific offset by increased interest income due to higher cash balances. Interest income and other increased $217,000 from 2010 to 2011. This increase was primarily due to income related to Travelzoo Asia Pacific offset by decreased interest income from lower cash balances.

Income Taxes
Our income is generally taxed in the U.S. and Canada and our income tax provision reflect federal, state and country statutory rates applicable to our levels of income, adjusted to take into account expenses that are treated as having no

35


recognizable tax benefit. Income tax expense was $7.6 million, $12.0 million and $10.3 million for 2012, 2011 and 2010, respectively. Our effective tax rate was 29%, 78% and 44% for 2012, 2011 and 2010, respectively.
Our effective tax rate decreased in 2012 compared to 2011 due primarily to the $20.0 million expense for the settlement with the State of Delaware that was treated as having no recognizable tax benefits in the year ended December 31, 2011. In the year ended December 31, 2012, the $3.0 million accrued expense for unexchanged promotional merger shares was treated as having no recognizable tax benefit. We expect that our effective tax rate in future periods may fluctuate depending on the geographic mix of our worldwide taxable income, total amount of expenses representing payments to former stockholders, losses or gains incurred by our operations in Canada and Europe, the use of accumulated losses to offset current taxable income and need for valuation allowances on certain tax assets, if any.
The Company has a valuation allowance of approximately $1.1 million as of December 31, 2012 related to foreign net operating loss carryforwards of approximately $8.3 million for which it is more likely than not that the tax benefit will not be realized. These net operating loss carryforwards do not expire. At December 31, 2012, the Company determined that approximately $800,000 of the total foreign net operating loss carryforward deferred tax assets will more likely than not be realized in future periods. Therefore, the Company recognized $800,000 of deferred tax assets associated with the foreign net operating loss carryforwards, as a reduction in the valuation allowance at December 31, 2012.
United States income and foreign withholding taxes have not been provided on undistributed earnings for certain non-U.S. subsidiaries. The undistributed earnings on a book basis for the non-U.S. subsidiaries are approximately $2.0 million. The Company intends to reinvest these earnings indefinitely in its operations outside the U.S. If the undistributed earnings are remitted to the U.S. these amounts would be taxable in the U.S at the current federal and state tax rates net of foreign tax credits. Also, depending on the jurisdiction any distribution may be subject to withholding taxes at rates applicable for that jurisdiction.
We file income tax returns in the U.S. federal jurisdiction and various states and foreign jurisdictions. We are subject to U.S. federal and certain state tax examinations for years after 2008 and are subject to California tax examinations for years after 2004. We are under examination by federal and state taxing authorities. We believe that adequate amounts have been reserved for any adjustments that may ultimately result from these examinations, although we cannot assure you that this will be the case given the inherent uncertainties in these examinations. Due to the ongoing tax examinations, we believe it is impractical to determine the amount and timing of these adjustments.
Segment Information
North America
 
 
Year Ended December 31,
 
2012
 
2011
 
2010
 
( In thousands)
Revenues
$
108,787

 
$
108,549

 
$
87,661

Income from operations
$
21,481

 
$
30,110

 
$
24,998

Income from operations as a % of revenues
20
%
 
28
%
 
29
%

North America revenues increased $238,000 in 2012 compared to 2011 (see “Revenues” above). North America expenses increased $9.1 million from 2011 to 2012. This increase was primarily due to a $6.6 million increase in salary and employee related expenses due in part to a headcount increase, a $2.0 million increase in cost of revenue primarily related to an increase in payments made to third-party partners of the Travelzoo Network, Local Deals and Getaway credit card fees, customer service and certain subscriber refunds, a $1.8 million increase in search traffic acquisition costs, offset by a $2.0 million decrease in television advertising expense and a $794,000 decrease in subscriber acquisition cost.
North America revenues increased $20.9 million in 2011 compared to 2010 (see “Revenues” above). North America expenses increased $16.0 million from 2010 to 2011. This increase was primarily due to a $5.3 million increase in cost of revenue primarily related to Local Deals and Getaway credit card fees, customer service and certain subscriber refunds, a $2.0 million dollar increase in television brand advertising expense and an $8.3 million salary and employee related expense due in part to a headcount increase, offset by a $403,000 decrease in search traffic acquisition costs and $1.7 million decrease in subscriber acquisition cost.

36


Europe
 
Year Ended December 31,
 
2012
 
2011
 
2010
 
( In thousands)
Revenues
$
42,381

 
$
39,793

 
$
25,123

Income from operations
$
7,008

 
$
4,912

 
$
(1,489
)
Income from operations as a % of revenues
17
%
 
12
%
 
(6
)%

Europe revenues increased $2.6 million in 2012 compared to 2011 (see “Revenues” above). Europe expenses increased $500,000 from 2011 to 2012. This increase was primarily due to a $451,000 increase in cost of revenue primarily related to an increase in Local Deals and Getaway credit card fees, customer service and certain subscriber refunds, a $2.1 million increase in salary and employee related expense due in part to a headcount increase, offset by a $1.8 million decrease in subscriber acquisition cost.
Europe revenues increased $14.7 million in 2011 compared to 2010 (see “Revenues” above). Europe expenses increased $8.3 million from 2010 to 2011. This increase was primarily due to a $1.3 million increase in cost of revenue primarily related to Local Deals and Getaway credit card fees, customer service and certain subscriber refunds, a $1.7 million increase in Search traffic acquisition costs and a $5.1 million increase in salary and employee related expense due in part to a headcount increase, offset by a $1.1 million decrease in subscriber acquisition cost.
Foreign currency movements relative to the U.S. dollar negatively impacted our income from our operations in Europe by approximately $16,000, $119,000 and $71,000 for 2012, 2011 and 2010, respectively.
Liquidity and Capital Resources
As of December 31, 2012, we had $61.2 million in cash and cash equivalents, of which $25.0 million was held outside the U.S. in certain of our foreign operations. If these assets are distributed to the U.S., we may be subject to additional U.S. taxes in certain circumstances. Cash and cash equivalents increased from $38.7 million as of December 31, 2011 primarily as a result of cash provided by operating activities, offset by cash used in investing and financing activities as explained below. We expect that cash on hand will be sufficient to provide for working capital needs for at least the next 12 months.
 
 
Year Ended December 31,
 
2012
 
2011
 
2010
 
( In thousands)
Net cash provided by operating activities
$
36,700

 
$
15,631

 
$
23,925

Net cash used in investing activities
(3,693
)
 
(2,460
)
 
(3,527
)
Net cash used in financing activities
(11,509
)
 
(14,815
)
 
1,076

Effect of exchange rate changes on cash and cash equivalents
927

 
(796
)
 
(66
)
Net increase (decrease) in cash and cash equivalents
$
22,425

 
$
(2,440
)
 
$
21,408


Net cash provided by operating activities is net income adjusted for certain non-cash items and changes in assets and liabilities. Net cash provided by operating activities increased $21.1 million in 2012 compared to 2011. The $21.1 million increase in cash provided by operating activities was due primarily to a $14.9 million increase in net income, an $8.3 million increase in income tax receivable, offset by a $1.8 million decrease in deferred income taxes. The $14.9 million increase in net income was primarily due to a $17.0 million decrease in expenses related to unexchanged promotional merger shares. The increase in the unrecognized tax benefit is related to a deduction taken on the Company's 2011 U.S. federal and state income tax returns for the $20.0 million settlement with the State of Delaware.
Net cash provided by operating activities decreased $8.3 million in 2011 compared to 2010. This decrease in cash provided by operating activities was primarily due to a $9.8 million decrease in net income, resulting primarily from a $20.0 million settlement to the State of Delaware related to an unclaimed property review, and a $8.9 million decrease in our income tax receivable; offset by a $7.3 million increase in accounts payable and accrued expenses and a $2.2 million increase in accounts receivable.

37


Net cash used in investing activities increased $1.2 million in 2012 compared to 2011. The $1.2 million increase in cash used in investing activities was due primarily to a $677,000 increase in purchase of intangible assets, a $284,000 increase in purchases of property and equipment and a $272,000 increase in restricted cash. Net cash used in investing activities decreased by $1.0 million in 2011 compared to 2010. This decrease in net cash used in investing activities was primarily due to a $2.2 million decrease in restricted cash, offset by a $1.2 million increase in purchases of property and equipment.

Net cash used by financing activities was $11.5 million in 2012 and $14.8 million 2011. Net cash provided by financing activities was $1.1 million for 2010. Net cash used by financing activities in 2012 was due to a $11.5 million repurchase of our common stock. Net cash used by financing activities in 2011 was due to a $15.1 million repurchase of our common stock offset by proceeds from the exercise of stock options and the excess tax benefit from exercise of stock options. The net cash provided by financing activities in 2010 resulted from the cash received from the sale of our Asia Pacific business segment.
On April 21, 2011, the Company entered into an agreement which required a $20.0 million cash payment to the State of Delaware resolving all claims relating to the State of Delaware’s unclaimed property review, which related primarily to unexchanged promotional merger shares contingency. Since March 2012, the Company has become subject to unclaimed property reviews by most of the other states in the U.S. that relate primarily to the unexchanged promotional merger shares, which were not covered by the settlement and release by the State of Delaware. During the three months ended March 31, 2012, the Company recorded a $3.0 million charge related to this unexchanged promotional merger shares contingency. While the Company believes it has meritorious defenses regarding the applicability of escheat rights related to this unexchanged promotional merger shares contingency, the ultimate resolution of this matter may take longer than one year to resolve. If the claims for all of the additional shares referred to in the preliminary findings were upheld in full, based on the closing price of the Company’s shares at the end of December 2012, the cost to the Company would be approximately $18.1 million in excess of the amount accrued, plus any interest or penalties which might be applicable. In addition, the total amount of exposure of this contingency is dependent upon the manner in which each state applies its unclaimed property laws. The Company is not able to predict the ultimate amount or outcome of any current or future claims which have been or might be asserted relating to the unissued shares.
The Company is continuing its program under which it makes cash payments to people who establish that they satisfy the condition to receive shares of Travelzoo.com Corporation, and who failed to submit requests to convert their shares into shares of Travelzoo Inc. within the required time period. See Note 1 to the accompanying consolidated financial statements for further details.
In July 2012, the Company announced a stock repurchase program authorizing the repurchase of up to 1,000,000 shares of the Company’s outstanding common stock. As of December 31, 2012, the Company repurchased 600,000 shares of common stock for an aggregate purchase price of $11.5 million. There are 400,000 shares remaining to be repurchased under this program.
Our capital requirements depend on a number of factors, including market acceptance of our products and services, the amount of our resources we devote to the development of new products, cash payments to former stockholders of Travelzoo.com Corporation, expansion of our operations, and the amount of resources we devote to promoting awareness of our Travelzoo and Fly.com brands. Since the inception of the program under which we make cash payments to people who establish that they were former stockholders of Travelzoo.com Corporation, and who failed to submit requests to convert their shares into shares of Travelzoo Inc. within the required time period, we have incurred expenses of $2.9 million. While future payments for this program are expected to decrease, the total cost of this program is still undeterminable because it is dependent on our stock price and on the number of valid requests ultimately received. In addition, we do not know if the current unclaimed property audits that are focused on the unexchanged promotional merger shares will result in additional payments to states or former stockholders of Travelzoo.com Corporation.
Consistent with our growth, we have experienced substantial increases in our cost of revenues, sales and marketing expenses and our general and administrative expenses, including increases in product development costs, and we anticipate that these increases will continue for the foreseeable future. We believe cash on hand will be sufficient to pay such costs for at least the next twelve months. In addition, we will continue to evaluate possible investments in businesses, products and technologies, the consummation of any of which would increase our capital requirements.
Although we currently believe that we have sufficient capital resources to meet our anticipated working capital and capital expenditure requirements for at least the next twelve months, unanticipated events and opportunities or a less favorable than expected development of our business in Europe with one or more of advertising formats may require us to sell additional equity or debt securities or establish new credit facilities to raise capital in order to meet our capital requirements.

38


If we sell additional equity or convertible debt securities, the sale could dilute the ownership of our existing stockholders. If we issue debt securities or establish a new credit facility, our fixed obligations could increase, and we may be required to agree to operating covenants that would restrict our operations. We cannot be sure that any such financing will be available in amounts or on terms acceptable to us.
If the development of our business is less favorable than expected, we may decide to significantly reduce the size of our operations and marketing expenses in certain markets with the objective of reducing cash outflow.
The information set forth under “Note 3 — Commitments and Contingencies” to the consolidated financial statements included in Part II, Item 8 of this report is incorporated herein by reference. Litigation and claims against the Company may result in legal defense costs, settlements or judgments that could have a material impact on our financial condition.
The following summarizes our principal contractual commitments as of December 31, 2012 (in thousands): 
 
2013
 
2014
 
2015
 
2016
 
2017
 
Thereafter
 
Total
Operating leases
$
5,049

 
$
2,669

 
$
2,507

 
$
1,969

 
$
975

 
$
2,370

 
$
15,539

Purchase obligations
1,182

 
688

 
205

 
17

 

 

 
2,092

Total commitments
$
6,231

 
$
3,357

 
$
2,712

 
$
1,986

 
$
975

 
$
2,370

 
$
17,631


We also have contingencies related to net unrecognized tax benefits of approximately $10.0 million as of December 31, 2012. We are unable to make reasonably reliable estimates on the timing of the cash settlements with the respective taxing authorities.
Critical Accounting Policies
We believe that there are a number of accounting policies that are critical to understanding our historical and future performance, as these policies affect the reported amounts of revenue and the more significant areas involving management’s judgments and estimates. These significant accounting policies relate to revenue recognition, reserve for subscriber refunds, allowance for doubtful accounts, income tax and loss contingencies. These policies, and our procedures related to these policies, are described in detail below.
Revenue Recognition
We recognize revenue on arrangements in accordance with the SEC Staff Accounting Bulletin for revenue recognition. We recognize advertising revenues in the period in which the advertisement is displayed, provided that evidence of an arrangement exists, the fees are fixed or determinable and collection of the resulting receivable is reasonably assured. Effective January 1, 2011, we adopted ASU 2009-13. The adoption of this new accounting standard had no material impact on the Company’s consolidated results of operations. If fixed-fee advertising is displayed over a term greater than one month, revenues are recognized ratably over the period as described below. The majority of insertion orders have terms that begin and end in a quarterly reporting period. In the cases where at the end of a quarterly reporting period the term of an insertion order is not complete, the Company allocates the total arrangement fee to each element based on the relative estimated selling price of each element. The Company uses prices stated on its internal rate card, which represents stand-alone sales prices, to establish estimated selling prices. The stand-alone price is the price that would be charged if the advertiser purchased only the individual insertion. Fees for variable-fee advertising arrangements are recognized based on the number of impressions displayed, number of clicks delivered, or number of referrals generated during the period. Under these policies, no revenue is recognized unless persuasive evidence of an arrangement exists, delivery has occurred, the fee is fixed or determinable, and collection is deemed reasonably assured. The Company evaluates each of these criteria as follows:
Evidence of an arrangement. We consider an insertion order signed by the advertiser or its agency to be evidence of an arrangement.
Delivery. Delivery is considered to occur when the advertising has been displayed and, if applicable, the click-throughs have been delivered.
Fixed or determinable fee. We consider the fee to be fixed or determinable if the fee is not subject to refund or adjustment and payment terms are standard.

39


Collection is deemed reasonably assured. We conduct a credit review for all transactions at the time of the arrangement to determine the creditworthiness of the advertiser. Collection is deemed reasonably assured if we expect that the advertiser will be able to pay amounts under the arrangement as payments become due. If we determine that collection is not reasonably assured, then we defer the revenue and recognize the revenue upon cash collection. Collection is deemed not reasonably assured when an advertiser is perceived to be in financial distress, which may be evidenced by weak industry conditions, a bankruptcy filing, or previously billed amounts that are past due.
Revenues from advertising sold to advertisers through agencies are reported at the net amount billed to the agency.
The Company started selling vouchers for Local Deals in third quarter 2010 and Getaway in second quarter 2011, from local businesses such as spas, hotels and restaurants. The Company earns a fee for acting as an agent in these transactions which is recorded on a net basis and is included in revenue upon completion of the voucher sale. Certain merchant contracts in foreign locations allow us to retain fees related to vouchers sold that are not redeemed by purchasers upon expiration, which we recognize as revenue after the expiration of the redemption period and after there are no further obligations to provide funds to merchants, subscribers or others.
Reserve for Subscriber Refunds
We record an estimated reserve for subscriber refunds based on our historical experience at the time revenue is recorded for Local Deals and Getaway voucher sales. We accrue costs associated with refunds in accrued expenses on the consolidated balance sheets. We consider many key factors such as the historical refunds based upon the time lag since the sale, historical reasons for refunds, time period that remains until the deal expiration date, any changes in refund procedures and estimates of redemptions and breakage. Should any of these factors change, the estimates made by management will also change, which could impact the level of our future reserves for subscriber refunds. Specifically, if the financial condition of our advertisers, the business that is providing the vouchered service, were to deteriorate, affecting their ability to provide the services to our subscribers, additional reserves for subscriber refunds may be required.
Estimated subscriber refunds that are determined to be recoverable from the merchant are recorded in the consolidated statements of operations as a reduction to revenue. Estimated subscriber refunds that are determined not to be recoverable from the merchant are presented as a cost of revenue. If our judgments regarding estimated subscriber refunds are inaccurate, reported results of operations could differ from the amount we previously accrued.
Allowance for Doubtful Accounts
We record a provision for doubtful accounts based on our historical experience of write-offs and a detailed assessment of our accounts receivable and allowance for doubtful accounts. In estimating the provision for doubtful accounts, management considers the age of the accounts receivable, our historical write-offs, the creditworthiness of the advertiser, the economic conditions of the advertiser’s industry, and general economic conditions, among other factors. Should any of these factors change, the estimates made by management will also change, which could impact the level of our future provision for doubtful accounts. Specifically, if the financial condition of our advertisers were to deteriorate, affecting their ability to make payments, additional provision for doubtful accounts may be required.
Income Taxes
We are subject to income taxes in the U.S. and numerous foreign jurisdictions. Significant judgment is required in evaluating our uncertain tax positions and determining our provision for income taxes. Although we believe we have adequately reserved for our uncertain tax positions, no assurance can be given that the final tax outcome of these matters will not be different. We adjust these reserves in light of changing facts and circumstances, such as the closing of a tax audit or the refinement of an estimate. To the extent that the final tax outcome of these matters is different than the amounts recorded, such differences will impact the provision for income taxes in the period in which such determination is made. The provision for income taxes includes the impact of reserve provisions and changes to reserves that are considered appropriate, as well as the related net interest.

40


Our effective tax rates have differed from the statutory rate primarily due to the tax impact of foreign operations, state taxes, certain benefits realized related to stock option activities, research and experimentation tax credits, the extent that our earnings are indefinitely reinvested outside the U.S. and tax asset valuation allowance determinations, including on certain loss carryforwards. For the years ended December 31, 2012 and 2011, our effective tax rates were 29% and 78%, respectively. Our future effective tax rates could be materially impacted by earnings being lower than anticipated in countries where we have lower statutory rates and higher than anticipated in countries where we have higher statutory rates, changes in the deferred tax assets or liabilities, changes in tax asset valuation allowance determinations including our valuation allowance on our European loss carryforwards, changes in our judgment about whether certain foreign earnings are indefinitely reinvested outside the U.S., or changes in tax laws, regulations, and accounting principles. In addition, we are subject to the continuous examination of our income tax returns by the IRS and other tax authorities. We regularly assess the likelihood of adverse outcomes resulting from these examinations to determine the adequacy of our provision for income taxes.
Loss Contingencies
We are involved in claims, suits, and proceedings arising from the ordinary course of our business. We record a provision for a liability when we believe that it is both probable that a liability has been incurred, and the amount can be reasonably estimated. Significant judgment is required to determine both probability and the estimated amount. Such claim proceedings are inherently unpredictable and subject to significant uncertainties, some of which are beyond our control. Should any of these estimates and assumptions change or prove to have been incorrect, it could have a material impact on our results of operations, financial position and cash flows. We have several known loss contingencies such as our liability to former stockholders of Travelzoo.com Corporation that may be realized as a result of our cash program for these claimants, State unclaimed property claims or otherwise and several lawsuits, both class actions and derivative lawsuits, as well as a patent infringement lawsuit. Please refer to Note 3 to the consolidated financial statements for further details about our loss contingencies.
Recent Accounting Pronouncements
See “Note 1 — Summary of Significant Accounting Policies” to the consolidated financial statements included in this report, regarding the impact of certain recent accounting pronouncements on our consolidated financial statements.
Item 7A. Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk
We believe that our potential exposure to changes in market interest rates is not material. The Company has no outstanding debt and is not a party to any derivative transactions. We invest in highly liquid investments with short maturities. Accordingly, we do not expect any material loss from these investments.
Our operations in Canada expose us to foreign currency risk associated with agreements being denominated in Canadian Dollars. Our operations in Europe expose us to foreign currency risk associated with agreements being denominated in British Pound Sterling and Euros. We are exposed to foreign currency risk associated with fluctuations of these currencies as the financial position and operating results of our operations in Canada and Europe are translated into U.S. Dollars for consolidation purposes. We do not use derivative instruments to hedge these exposures. We are a net receiver of U.S. Dollars from our foreign subsidiaries and therefore benefit from a weaker U.S. dollar and are adversely affected by a stronger U.S. dollar relative to the foreign currency used by the foreign subsidiary as its functional currency. We have performed a sensitivity analysis as of December 31, 2012, using a modeling technique that measures the change in the fair values arising from a hypothetical 10% adverse movement in the levels of foreign currency exchange rates relative to the U.S. dollar with all other variables held constant. The foreign currency exchange rates we used were based on market rates in effect at December 31, 2012. The sensitivity analysis indicated that a hypothetical 10% adverse movement in foreign currency exchange rates would result in an incremental $86,000 foreign exchange loss for the year ended December 31, 2012.


41


Item 8. Financial Statements and Supplementary Data
TRAVELZOO INC.
INDEX TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
 
 
 
 
Page
Report of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm
42

Consolidated Balance Sheets
43

Consolidated Statements of Operations
44

Consolidated Statements of Comprehensive Income
45

Consolidated Statements of Stockholders’ Equity
46

Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows
47

Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements
48



REPORT OF INDEPENDENT REGISTERED PUBLIC ACCOUNTING FIRM
The Board of Directors and Stockholders
Travelzoo Inc.:
We have audited the accompanying consolidated balance sheets of Travelzoo Inc. and subsidiaries (Travelzoo) as of December 31, 2012 and 2011, and the related consolidated statements of income, comprehensive income, stockholders' equity, and cash flows for each of the years in the three-year period ended December 31, 2012. We also have audited Travelzoo's internal control over financial reporting as of December 31, 2012, based on criteria established in Internal Control - Integrated Framework issued by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission (COSO). Travelzoo's management is responsible for these consolidated financial statements, for maintaining effective internal control over financial reporting, and for its assessment of the effectiveness of internal control over financial reporting, included in the accompanying management's report. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on these consolidated financial statements and an opinion on Travelzoo's internal control over financial reporting based on our audits.
We conducted our audits in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States). Those standards require that we plan and perform the audits to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the consolidated financial statements are free of material misstatement and whether effective internal control over financial reporting was maintained in all material respects. Our audits of the consolidated financial statements included examining, on a test basis, evidence supporting the amounts and disclosures in the consolidated financial statements, assessing the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by management, and evaluating the overall financial statement presentation. Our audit of internal control over financial reporting included obtaining an understanding of internal control over financial reporting, assessing the risk that a material weakness exists, and testing and evaluating the design and operating effectiveness of internal control based on the assessed risk. Our audits also included performing such other procedures as we considered necessary in the circumstances. We believe that our audits provide a reasonable basis for our opinions.
A company's internal control over financial reporting is a process designed to provide reasonable assurance regarding the reliability of financial reporting and the preparation of financial statements for external purposes in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles. A company's internal control over financial reporting includes those policies and procedures that (1) pertain to the maintenance of records that, in reasonable detail, accurately and fairly reflect the transactions and dispositions of the assets of the company; (2) provide reasonable assurance that transactions are recorded as necessary to permit preparation of financial statements in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles, and that receipts and expenditures of the company are being made only in accordance with authorizations of management and directors of the company; and (3) provide reasonable assurance regarding prevention or timely detection of unauthorized acquisition, use, or disposition of the company's assets that could have a material effect on the financial statements.
Because of its inherent limitations, internal control over financial reporting may not prevent or detect misstatements. Also, projections of any evaluation of effectiveness to future periods are subject to the risk that controls may become inadequate because of changes in conditions, or that the degree of compliance with the policies or procedures may deteriorate.

42


In our opinion, the consolidated financial statements referred to above present fairly, in all material respects, the financial position of Travelzoo Inc. and subsidiaries as of December 31, 2012 and 2011, and the results of their operations and their cash flows for each of the years in the three-year period ended December 31, 2012, in conformity with U.S. generally accepted accounting principles. Also in our opinion, Travelzoo maintained, in all material respects, effective internal control over financial reporting as of December 31, 2012, based on criteria established in Internal Control - Integrated Framework issued by COSO.

/s/ KPMG LLP
Santa Clara, California
February 8, 2013


43


TRAVELZOO INC.
CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS
(In thousands, except par value)
 
 
December 31,
2012
 
December 31,
2011
ASSETS
 
 
 
Current assets:
 
 
 
Cash and cash equivalents
$
61,169

 
$
38,744

Accounts receivable, less allowance for doubtful accounts of $498 and $400 as of December 31, 2012 and 2011, respectively
13,626

 
13,340

Income tax receivable
6,682

 
3,625

Deposits
389

 
278

Prepaid expenses and other current assets
2,260

 
2,123

Deferred tax assets
2,194

 
1,754

Total current assets
86,320

 
59,864

Deposits, less current portion
1,107

 
776

Deferred tax assets, less current portion
1,710

 
344

Restricted cash
3,396

 
3,103

Property and equipment, net
4,314

 
3,557

Intangible assets, net
986

 
704

Total assets
$
97,833

 
$
68,348

LIABILITIES AND STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY
 
 
 
Current liabilities:
 
 
 
Accounts payable
$
28,695

 
$
21,731

Accrued expenses
11,993

 
6,311

Deferred revenue
2,698

 
2,168

Income tax payable

 
279

Deferred rent
280

 
114

Total current liabilities
43,666

 
30,603

Long-term tax liabilities
10,030

 
2,225

Deferred rent, less current portion
798

 
761

Commitments and contingencies

 

Stockholders’ equity:
 
 
 
Preferred stock, $0.01 par value per share (5,000 shares authorized; none issued)

 

Common stock, $0.01 par value (40,000 shares authorized; 15,801 shares issued and 15,362 outstanding as of December 31, 2012 and 16,462 shares issued and 15,962 shares outstanding as of December 31, 2011)
163

 
164

Treasury stock (at cost, 438 and 500 shares at December 31, 2012 and 2011, respectively)
(7,898
)
 
(15,123
)
Additional paid-in capital
8,863

 
7,656

Retained earnings
42,948

 
43,484

Accumulated other comprehensive loss
(737
)
 
(1,422
)
Total stockholders’ equity
43,339

 
34,759

Total liabilities and stockholders’ equity
$
97,833

 
$
68,348


See accompanying notes to consolidated financial statements.

44


TRAVELZOO INC.
CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF INCOME
(In thousands, except per share amounts)
 
 
 
 
2012
 
2011
 
2010
Revenues
$
151,168

 
$
148,342

 
$
112,784

Cost of revenues
15,745

 
13,283

 
7,253

Gross profit
135,423

 
135,059

 
105,531

Operating expenses:
 
 
 
 
 
Sales and marketing
68,242

 
65,490

 
54,454

General and administrative
38,692

 
34,547

 
27,565

Unexchanged promotional merger shares
3,000

 
20,000

 

Total operating expenses
109,934

 
120,037

 
82,019

Income from operations
25,489

 
15,022

 
23,512

Interest income and other income
305

 
383

 
166

Gain (loss) on foreign currency
4

 
(81
)
 
(197
)
Income before income taxes
25,798

 
15,324

 
23,481

Income taxes
7,600

 
12,005

 
10,324

Net income
$
18,198

 
$
3,319

 
$
13,157

Basic net income per share
$
1.15

 
$
0.20

 
$
0.80

Diluted net income per share
$
1.14

 
$
0.20

 
$
0.80

Shares used in computing basic net income per share
15,866

 
16,315

 
16,444

Shares used in computing diluted net income per share
15,901

 
16,414

 
16,453


See accompanying notes to consolidated financial statements.


45


TRAVELZOO INC.
CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF COMPREHENSIVE INCOME
(In thousands)
 
 
 
 
2012
 
2011
 
2010
Net income
$
18,198

 
$
3,319

 
$
13,157

Other comprehensive income (loss):
 
 
 
 
 
Foreign currency translation adjustment
685

 
(384
)
 
135

Total comprehensive income
$
18,883

 
$
2,935

 
$
13,292


See accompanying notes to consolidated financial statements.


46


TRAVELZOO INC.
CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY
 (In thousands, except per share amounts)
 
Common Stock
 
Treasury
Stock
 
Additional
Paid-In
Capital
 
Retained
Earnings
 
Accumulated
Other
Comprehensive
Income (Loss)
 
Total
Stockholders’
Equity
 
Shares
 
Amount
 
Balances, December 31, 2009
16,444

 
164

 

 
4,772

 
27,008

 
(1,173
)
 
30,771

Stock-based compensation expense

 

 

 
750

 

 

 
750

Capital contribution from majority shareholder

 

 

 
1,076

 

 

 
1,076

Comprehensive income:
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Foreign currency translation adjustment

 

 
 
 

 

 
135

 
135

Net income

 

 

 

 
13,157

 

 
13,157

Total comprehensive income

 

 

 

 

 

 
13,292

Balances, December 31, 2010
16,444

 
164

 

 
6,598

 
40,165

 
(1,038
)
 
45,889

Stock-based compensation expense

 

 

 
750

 

 

 
750

Proceeds from exercise of stock options
18

 

 

 
40

 

 

 
40

Repurchase of common stock
(500
)
 

 
(15,123
)
 

 

 

 
(15,123
)
Tax benefit from stock option exercise

 

 

 
268

 

 

 
268

Comprehensive income:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Foreign currency translation adjustment

 

 

 

 

 
(384
)
 
(384
)
Net income

 

 

 

 
3,319

 

 
3,319

Total comprehensive income

 

 

 

 

 

 
2,935

Balances, December 31, 2011
15,962

 
164

 
(15,123
)
 
7,656

 
43,484

 
(1,422
)
 
34,759

Stock-based compensation expense

 

 

 
1,207

 

 

 
1,207

Retirement of treasury stock
(161
)
 
(1
)
 
18,735

 
 
 
(18,734
)
 
 
 

Repurchase of common stock
(439
)
 

 
(11,510
)
 

 

 

 
(11,510
)
Comprehensive income:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Foreign currency translation adjustment

 

 

 

 

 
685

 
685

Net income

 

 

 

 
18,198

 

 
18,198

Total comprehensive income

 

 

 

 

 

 
18,883

Balances, December 31, 2012
15,362

 
$
163

 
$
(7,898
)
 
$
8,863

 
$
42,948

 
$
(737
)
 
$
43,339


See accompanying notes to consolidated financial statements.



47


TRAVELZOO INC.
CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS
(In thousands)
 
 
Year Ended December 31,
 
2012
 
2011
 
2010
Cash flows from operating activities:
 
 
 
 
 
Net income
$
18,198

 
$
3,319

 
$
13,157

Adjustments to reconcile net income to net cash provided by operating activities:
 
 
 
 
 
Depreciation and amortization
2,539

 
2,725

 
2,389

Deferred income tax
(2,178
)
 
(337
)
 
(1,276
)
Stock-based compensation
1,207

 
750

 
750

Provision for losses on accounts receivable
162

 
52

 
199

Tax benefit of stock option exercise

 
(268
)
 

Net foreign currency effect
(4
)
 
81

 
197

Changes in operating assets and liabilities:
 
 
 
 
 
Accounts receivable
(285
)
 
(146
)
 
(2,323
)
Deposits
(406
)
 
(667
)
 
20

Income tax receivable
5,171

 
(3,093
)
 
5,797

Prepaid expenses and other current assets
87

 
(584
)
 
(413
)
Accounts payable
6,403

 
12,074

 
3,232

Accrued expenses
5,568

 
256

 
1,830

Deferred revenue
513

 
853

 
498

Deferred rent
45

 
209

 
(72
)
Income tax payable
(285
)
 
(369
)
 
630

Other non-current liabilities
(35
)
 
776

 
(690
)
Net cash provided by operating activities
36,700

 
15,631

 
23,925

Cash flows from investing activities:
 
 
 
 
 
Purchases of property and equipment
(2,744
)
 
(2,460
)
 
(1,279
)
Purchases of intangible asset
(677
)
 

 

Purchases of restricted cash
(272
)
 

 
(2,248
)
Net cash used in investing activities
(3,693
)
 
(2,460
)
 
(3,527
)
Cash flows from financing activities:
 
 
 
 
 
Repurchase of common stock
(11,510
)
 
(15,123
)
 

Proceeds from sale of Asia Pacific business segment, net of cash provided

 

 
1,076

Proceeds from exercise of stock options

 
40

 

Tax benefit of stock option exercise

 
268

 

Net cash provided by (used in) financing activities
(11,510
)
 
(14,815
)
 
1,076

Effect of exchange rate changes on cash and cash equivalents
928

 
(796
)
 
(66
)
Net increase (decrease) in cash and cash equivalents
22,425

 
(2,440
)
 
21,408

Cash and cash equivalents at beginning of period
38,744

 
41,184

 
19,776

Cash and cash equivalents at end of period
$
61,169

 
$
38,744

 
$
41,184

Supplemental disclosure of cash flow information:
 
 
 
 
 
Cash paid for income taxes, net of refunds received
$
4,937

 
$
15,025

 
$
5,857


See accompanying notes to consolidated financial statements.

48


TRAVELZOO INC.
NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

Note 1: Summary of Significant Accounting Policies
(a) The Company and Basis of Presentation
Travelzoo Inc. (the “Company” or “Travelzoo”) is a global Internet media company. We inform over 26 million subscribers in North America, Europe and Asia Pacific, as well as millions of website users, about the best travel, entertainment and local deals available from thousands of companies. Our deal experts source, research and test-book offers, recommending only those that meet Travelzoo’s rigorous quality standards. We provide travel, entertainment, and local businesses with a fast, flexible, and cost effective way to reach millions of consumers. Our revenues are generated primarily from advertising fees. In Asia Pacific, the Travelzoo business is operated by Travelzoo (Asia) Limited and Travelzoo Japan K.K. under a license agreement with Travelzoo Inc. and is not owned by the Company.
Our publications and products include the Travelzoo websites (www.travelzoo.com, www.travelzoo.ca, www.travelzoo.co.uk, www.travelzoo.de, www.travelzoo.es, www.travelzoo.fr, among others), the Travelzoo Top 20 e-mail newsletter, the Newsflash e-mail alert service, the SuperSearch pay-per-click travel search tool, and the Travelzoo Network, a network of third-party websites that list travel deals published by Travelzoo. We also operate Fly.com, a travel search engine that allows users to quickly and easily find the best prices on flights from hundreds of airlines and online travel agencies. In addition, we operate Local Deals and Getaway, services that allow our subscribers to purchase vouchers for deals from local businesses such as spas, hotels and restaurants through the Travelzoo website. Vouchers are redeemable at the local businesses during the promotional period. We receive a percentage of the face value of the voucher from the local businesses.
Since November 1, 2009, the Travelzoo websites in Asia Pacific (cn.travelzoo.com, www.travelzoo.co.jp, www.travelzoo.com.au, www.travelzoo.com.hk, www.travelzoo.com.tw, among others), the Travelzoo Top 20 e-mail newsletters in Asia Pacific and the Newsflash e-mail alert service in Asia Pacific have been published by Travelzoo (Asia) Limited and Travelzoo Japan K.K., wholly owned subsidiaries of Azzurro Capital Inc., under a license agreement with the Company. There is a reciprocal revenue-sharing agreement among the entities operating the Travelzoo business in Asia Pacific and the Company related to cross-selling audiences, channels and offers.
Travelzoo is controlled by Ralph Bartel, who held beneficially approximately 50.5% of the outstanding shares as of December 31, 2012.
The consolidated financial statements include the accounts of the Company and its wholly-owned subsidiaries. All significant intercompany accounts and transactions have been eliminated in consolidation. All foreign subsidiaries use the local currency of their respective countries as their functional currency. Assets and liabilities are translated into U.S. dollars at exchange rates prevailing at the balance sheet dates. Revenues, costs and expenses are translated into U.S. dollars at average exchange rates for the period. Certain prior period amounts have been reclassified to conform to current year presentation.
The Company was formed as a result of a combination and merger of entities founded by the Company’s majority stockholder, Ralph Bartel. In 1998, Mr. Bartel founded Travelzoo.com Corporation, a Bahamas corporation, which issued 5,155,874 shares via the Internet to approximately 700,000 “Netsurfer stockholders” for no cash consideration, but subject to certain conditions as referred to below. In 1998, Mr. Bartel also founded Silicon Channels Corporation, a California corporation, to operate the Travelzoo website. During 2001, Travelzoo Inc. was formed as a subsidiary of Travelzoo.com Corporation, and Mr. Bartel contributed all of the outstanding shares of Silicon Channels Corporation to Travelzoo Inc. in exchange for 8,129,273 shares of Travelzoo Inc. and options to acquire an additional 2,158,349 shares at $1.00. Mr. Bartel exercised these options in January 2009.

49


In April 2002, Travelzoo.com Corporation was merged into Travelzoo Inc. Under and subject to the terms of the merger agreement, holders of promotional shares of Travelzoo.com Corporation (“Netsurfers”) who established that they had satisfied certain prerequisite qualifications were allowed a period of 2 years following the effective date of the merger to receive 1 share of Travelzoo Inc. in exchange for each share of common stock of Travelzoo.com Corporation. The records of Travelzoo.com Corporation showed that, assuming all of the shares applied for by the Netsurfer stockholders were validly issued, there were 11,295,874 shares of Travelzoo.com Corporation outstanding. As of April 25, 2004, two years following the effective date of the merger, 7,180,342 shares of Travelzoo.com Corporation had been exchanged for shares of Travelzoo Inc. Prior to that date, the remaining shares which were available for issuance pursuant to the merger agreement were also included in the issued and outstanding common stock of Travelzoo Inc. and included in the calculation of basic and diluted earnings per share. After April 25, 2004, the Company ceased issuing shares to the former stockholders of Travelzoo.com Corporation, and no additional shares are reserved for issuance to any former stockholders, because their right to receive shares has now expired. On April 25, 2004, the number of shares reported as outstanding was reduced from 19,425,147 to 15,309,615 to reflect actual shares issued as of the expiration date. Earnings per share calculations reflect this reduction of the number of shares reported as outstanding. As of December 31, 2012, there were 15,361,873 shares of common stock outstanding.
On April 21, 2011, the Company entered into an agreement with the State of Delaware resolving all claims relating to an unclaimed property review which began in 2010. The primary issue raised in the preliminary findings from the review, received by the Company on April 12, 2011, concerned the shares of Travelzoo which have not been claimed by former Netsurfer stockholders of Travelzoo.com as discussed in the preceding paragraph. In the preliminary findings under the unclaimed property review, up to 3.0 million shares were identified as “demandable” under Delaware escheat laws. While the Company continues to take the position that such shares were a promotional incentive and were issuable only to persons who establish their eligibility as stockholders, the Company determined that it was in its best interest to promptly resolve all claims relating to the unclaimed property review. The Company made a $20.0 million cash payment to the State of Delaware on April 27, 2011 and received a complete release of those claims.
Since March 2012, the Company has become subject to unclaimed property reviews by most of the other states in the U.S. The auditing firm representing these states in the reviews has presented to the Company preliminary findings, which relate primarily to the unexchanged promotional merger shares that were not covered by the settlement and release by the State of Delaware. During the three months ended March 31, 2012, the Company recorded a $3.0 million charge related to this unexchanged promotional merger shares contingency. While the Company believes it has meritorious defenses regarding the applicability of escheat rights related to this unexchanged promotional merger shares contingency, the ultimate resolution of this matter may take longer than one year. If the claims for all of the additional shares referred to in the preliminary findings were upheld in full, based on the closing price of the Company’s shares at the end of December 31, 2012, the cost to the Company would be approximately $18.1 million in excess of the amount accrued, plus any interest or penalty which might be applicable. In addition, the total amount of exposure of this contingency is dependent upon the manner in which each state applies its unclaimed property laws. The Company is not able to predict the ultimate amount or outcome of any current or future claims which have been or might be asserted relating to the unissued shares.
The Company intends to continue to challenge the applicability of escheat rights, in that, among other reasons, the shares of the predecessor Bahamas corporation were offered for free as part of a promotional incentive program to qualified individuals. There were certain conditions applicable to the issuance of shares to the Netsurfer stockholders, including requirements that (i) they be at least 18 years of age, (ii) they be residents of the U.S. or Canada, and (iii) they not apply for shares more than once. The Netsurfer stockholders were advised that failure to comply could result in cancellation of their shares in Travelzoo.com Corporation. Travelzoo.com Corporation was not able to verify that the applicants met the requirements referred to above at the time of their applications for issuance of shares, and the remaining Netsurfer stockholders who have not qualified to receive shares in the Company, or who have not participated in the cash payments program referred to below, have not demonstrated their actual compliance with the conditions to the issuance of shares by Travelzoo.com Corporation. The Company does not know how many of the requests for shares originally received by Travelzoo.com Corporation in 1998 were valid, but the Company believes that only a portion of such requests were valid. In response to the pending reviews referred to above, and in response to other persons claiming to be former stockholders of Travelzoo.com Corporation, the Company intends to assert that the claimant must establish that the original Netsurfer stockholders complied with the conditions to issuance of their shares.
The Company is continuing its program under which it makes cash payments to people who establish that they satisfy the conditions to receive shares of Travelzoo.com Corporation, and who failed to submit requests to convert their shares into shares of Travelzoo Inc. within the required time period. The accompanying consolidated financial statements include a charge in general and administrative expenses of $33,000 for these cash payments for the year ended December 31, 2012.
The total cost of this program is not reliably estimable because it is based on the ultimate number of valid requests received and future levels of the Company’s common stock price, and would be affected by any settlement of the pending

50


reviews referred to above. The Company’s common stock price affects the liability because the amount of cash payments under the program is based in part on the recent level of the stock price at the date valid requests are received. As noted above, in order to receive payment under the program, a person is required to establish that such person validly held shares in Travelzoo.com Corporation.
In July 2012, the Company announced a stock repurchase program authorizing the repurchase of up to 1,000,000 shares of the Company’s outstanding common stock. As of December 31, 2012, the Company has purchased 600,000 shares of common stock for an aggregate purchase price of $11.5 million under the stock repurchase program.
(b) Revenue Recognition
The Company’s revenue consists primarily of advertising sales. Advertising revenues are principally derived from the sale of advertising in North America and Europe on the Travelzoo website, in the Travelzoo Top 20 e-mail newsletter, in Newsflash, from SuperSearch, from the Travelzoo Network, and from Fly.com. The Company also generates revenue from the sale of vouchers through our Local Deals and Getaway e-mail alert services.
The Company recognizes revenues in accordance with the SEC Staff Accounting Bulletin for revenue recognition. Advertising revenues are recognized in the period in which the advertisement is displayed, provided that evidence of an arrangement exists, the fees are fixed or determinable and collection of the resulting receivable is reasonably assured. Effective January 1, 2011, we adopted ASU 2009-13. The adoption of this new accounting standard had no material impact on the Company’s consolidated results of operations.
Where collectibility is not reasonably assured, the revenue will be recognized upon cash collection, provided that the other criteria for revenue recognition have been met. The Company recognizes revenue for fixed-fee advertising arrangements ratably over the term of the insertion order as described below, with the exception of Travelzoo Top 20 or Newsflash insertions, which are recognized upon delivery. The majority of insertion orders have terms that begin and end in a quarterly reporting period. In the cases where at the end of a quarterly reporting period the term of an insertion order is not complete, the Company allocates the total arrangement fee to each element based on the relative estimated selling price of each element. The Company recognizes revenue for the period based on elements delivered during the period. The Company uses prices stated on its internal rate card, which represents stand-alone sales prices, to establish estimated selling prices. The stand-alone price is the price that would be charged if the advertiser purchased only the individual insertion. Fees for variable-fee advertising arrangements are recognized based on the number of impressions displayed, number of clicks delivered, or number of referrals generated during the period.
Under these policies, no revenue is recognized unless persuasive evidence of an arrangement exists, delivery has occurred, the fee is fixed or determinable, and collection is deemed reasonably assured. The Company evaluates each of these criteria as follows:
Evidence of an arrangement. The Company considers an insertion order signed by the advertiser or its agency to be evidence of an arrangement.
Delivery. Delivery is considered to occur when the advertising has been displayed and, if applicable, the click-throughs have been delivered.
Fixed or determinable fee. The Company considers the fee to be fixed or determinable if the fee is not subject to refund or adjustment and payment terms are standard.
Collection is deemed reasonably assured. The Company conducts a credit review for all transactions at the time of the arrangement to determine the creditworthiness of the advertiser. Collection is deemed reasonably assured if it is expected that the advertiser will be able to pay amounts under the arrangement as payments become due. If it is determined that collection is not reasonably assured, then revenue is deferred and recognized upon cash collection. Collection is deemed not reasonably assured when an advertiser is perceived to be in financial distress, which may be evidenced by weak industry condition, bankruptcy filing, or previously billed amounts that are past due.
Insertion orders that include fixed-fee advertising are invoiced upon acceptance of the insertion order and on the first day of each month over the term of the insertion order, with the exception of Travelzoo Top 20 or Newsflash listings, which are invoiced upon delivery. Insertion orders that include variable-fee advertising are invoiced at the end of the month. The Company’s standard terms state that in the event that Travelzoo fails to publish advertisements as specified in the insertion order, the liability of Travelzoo to the advertiser shall be limited to, at Travelzoo’s sole discretion, a pro rata refund of the advertising fee, the placement of the advertisements at a later time in a comparable position, or the extension of the term of the insertion order until the advertising is fully delivered. The Company believes that no significant obligations exist after the full delivery of advertising.
Revenues from advertising sold to advertisers through agencies are reported at the net amount billed to the agency.

51


The Company started selling vouchers for Local Deals in third quarter 2010 and Getaway in second quarter 2011, from local businesses such as spas, hotels and restaurants. The Company earns a fee for acting as an agent in these transactions which is recorded on a net basis and is included in revenue upon completion of the voucher sale. Certain merchant contracts in foreign locations allow us to retain fees related to vouchers sold that are not redeemed by purchasers upon expiration, which we recognize as revenue after the expiration of the redemption period and after there are no further obligations to provide funds to merchants, subscribers or others.
(c) Reserve for Subscriber Refunds
We record an estimated reserve for subscriber refunds based on our historical experience at the time revenue is recorded for Local Deals and Getaway voucher sales. We accrue costs associated with refunds in accrued expenses on the consolidated balance sheets. We consider many key factors such as the historical refunds based upon the time lag since the sale, historical reasons for refunds, time period that remains until the deal expiration date, any changes in refund procedures and estimates of redemptions and breakage. Should any of these factors change, the estimates made by management will also change, which could impact the level of our future reserves for subscriber refunds. Specifically, if the financial condition of our advertisers, the business that is providing the vouchered service, were to deteriorate, affecting their ability to provide the services to our subscribers, additional reserves for subscriber refunds may be required.
Estimated subscriber refunds that are determined to be recoverable from the merchant are recorded in the consolidated statements of operations as a reduction to revenue. Estimated subscriber refunds that are determined not to be recoverable from the merchant, are presented as a cost of revenue. If our judgments regarding estimated subscriber refunds are inaccurate, reported results of operations could differ from the amount we previously accrued.
(d) Allowance for Doubtful Accounts
We record a provision for doubtful accounts based on our historical experience of write-offs and a detailed assessment of our accounts receivable and allowance for doubtful accounts. In estimating the provision for doubtful accounts, management considers the age of the accounts receivable, our historical write-offs, the creditworthiness of the advertiser, the economic conditions of the advertiser’s industry, and general economic conditions, among other factors. Should any of these factors change, the estimates made by management will also change, which could impact the level of our future provision for doubtful accounts. Specifically, if the financial condition of our advertisers were to deteriorate, affecting their ability to make payments, additional provision for doubtful accounts may be required.
(e) Net Income Per Share
Basic net income per share is computed using the weighted-average number of common shares outstanding for the period. Diluted net income per share is computed by adjusting the weighted-average number of common shares outstanding for the effect of dilutive potential common shares outstanding during the period. Potential common shares included in the diluted calculation consist of incremental shares issuable upon the exercise of outstanding stock options calculated using the treasury stock method.
The following table sets forth the calculation of basic and diluted net income per share (in thousands, except per share amounts):
 
 
Year Ended December 31,
 
2012
 
2011
 
2010
Basic net income per share:
 
 
 
 
 
Net income
$
18,198

 
$
3,319

 
$
13,157

Weighted average common shares
15,866

 
16,315

 
16,444

Basic net income per share
$
1.15

 
$
0.20

 
$
0.80

Diluted net income per share:
 
 
 
 
 
Net income
$
18,198

 
$
3,319

 
$
13,157

Weighted average common shares
15,866

 
16,315

 
16,444

Effect of dilutive securities: stock options
35

 
99

 
9

Diluted weighted average common shares
15,901

 
16,414

 
16,453

Diluted net income per